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Noza school entrance porch - Leszek Gliniecki top row, sixth from right
Image by Leszek Gliniecki courtesy Leszek Gliniecki
Document from the Archangelsk Archives stating that my family, and I, were in Kriesty from 24.02.1940 to 07.09.1941.
Image by Leszek Gliniecki courtesy Leszek Gliniecki
Document from Polish archives of the Institute of National Remembrance in Warsaw stating that Witold Glinski, born 1926, arrived at the same time as his mother, sister and brother, to Kriesty on the 24.02.1940, and left Kriesty, at the same time as his mother, sister and brother, to Szachunia on the 07.09.1941. And also that the Gliniecki, family including myself, arrived at Kriesty on the 24.02.1940 and left on 07.09.1941.
Image by Leszek Gliniecki courtesy Leszek Gliniecki
The Gliniecki Family´s Barrack number 4 in Kreisky 1940. 4 people per bunk. These were barracks for those specifically exiled to special settlements. People who were forcibly removed from their homes and deported to these places with restricted movement. These were not GULAGS.
Image by Leszek Gliniecki courtesy Leszek Gliniecki
Map shows the normal route all Poles would take to get out of Russia, into Tashkent area -Caspian Sea - Pahlevi (Persia) as against Glinski's route to Irkutsk, away from the exit area for Poles, the Polish Army, and Poles generally.
Document from Archives of Archangelsk Province stating that Witold Glinski, born in 1926, arrived at the same time as his mother, sister and brother, to Kriesty on 24.02.1940. He left Kriesty, also at the same time as his mother sister and brother, for Szachunia on 02.09.1941.
Image by Leszek Gliniecki courtesy Leszek Gliniecki
Letter from British Ministry of Defence (Polish Section) states that their archives state that Witold Glinski was born in 1926, and that he was the only one of that name in the Polish Army under British Command.
Image by Leszek Gliniecki courtesy Leszek Gliniecki

Gliniecki: "I have solid evidence Glinski didn't do The Long Walk"

Posted: Jan 04, 2011 04:08 pm EST

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After Slavomir Rawicz's Long Walk story was debunked, and 50 years after the described events, Witold Glinski showed up with an almost identical albeit muted version of the walk. Glinski, equally unable to provide solid evidence backing his story, told reporters that his tale had possibly been stolen by Rawicz from official papers while he himself had felt forced to silence by a murderer. Glinski's version fast made it into the media and recently onto the movie screen, and involved high officials in the Polish...

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