Heads up: Frédéric Dion to kite-ski solo to South Pole of Inaccessibility

Heads up: Frédéric Dion to kite-ski solo to South Pole of Inaccessibility

Posted: Nov 01, 2014 03:08 pm EDT

 

(By Correne Coetzer) Another French speaker is heading to Antarctica. Frédérick Dion shot over news from Cape Town, South Africa, that he is leaving for Antarctica on November 4 with ALCI/TAC. The Canadian will attempt to solo kite-ski from Novolazarevskaya (Novo) to the South Pole of Inaccessibility (POI) in about 60 days. This point has not been reached by a solo adventurer before.

 

The distance, in a straight line to S82°06.696 E055°01.951 where Eric McNair-Landry and Sebastian Copeland found the bust of Lenin at the POI on December 27  2011, is 1610 km. The Bust was left by a 1957 motorized Russian expedition. In 2007 Paul Landry led three Brits, Henry Cookson, Rupert Longsdon and Rory Sweet from the coast near Novo to the bust of Lenin. 

 

Read in the links below the accounts of the Spaniards to find the two Poles of Inaccessibility in 2005.

 

According to the Scott Polar Research Institute this is the point furthest from navigable sea, rather than the 'theoretical' edge of the continent. In 2005 The Scott Polar Research Institute stated to ExplorersWeb their definition of the Southern Pole of Inaccessibility:

 

"The position of the Southern Pole of Inaccessibility (85 deg 50 min S 65 deg 47 min E) is based on a calculations from the edges of the ice-shelves or a rocky coast. These are positions which may be reached by an icebreaker or similar vessel. It is thus reasonably constant and does not take account of seasonally variable pack ice (which is essentially a feature of the ocean rather than derived from the continental land mass)." 

 

 

LINKS:

 

Spaniards reach South Pole of Inaccessibility - but where is Lenin?

 

Spaniards reach the 'second' South Pole of Inaccessibility - still no trace of Lenin

 

ExWeb interview Sebastian Copeland and Eric McNair-Landry (part 1/2): The battle of body and gear across 2 South Poles

 

ExWeb interview Sebastian Copeland and Eric McNair-Landry (part 2/2): An odd encounter in a paralleled universe

 

ExWeb interview with Paul Landry (Part 1), The Russians were super excited to see the photos of Lenin

 

"It so, so very surreal," team n2i meets Lenin at the POI!

 

According to the Rules of Adventure, to claim a “solo" achievement, requires an unassisted status - therefore no supplies carried by pilots or car drivers, or anything (food, fuel, etc) received from any person along the way. A solo person may be wind supported (kites/sails). Note that the Polar Rules were compiled by early Norwegian and British Polar explorers (not exclusively ExplorersWeb) and are maintained today by the current community of veteran polar skiers.

 

 

 

LINKS:

 

2014-15 SOUTH POLE TEAMS

 

Unassisted Supported

(no resupplies, wind-support)

 

Solo traverse Novo - GSP- Hercules Inlet

Faysal Hanneche (FR)

 

Solo, kite-ski Novo - POI

Frédéric Dion (CA,)

 

Assisted Unsupported

 

Traverse Messner - GSP - Hercules Inlet

Stéphanie Gicquel(FR)

Jérémie Gicquel (FR) 

Are Johansen NO 

 

Newall Hunter (UK, Messner to GSP)

 

Adventure Consultants team

Hercules Inlet route

Einar Torfi Finnsson (IS, guide)

Hugh Dougall 

Bill Morrison

Tim Garrett

 

ANI Messner Route team 

Robert Smith (guide)

Paula J Reid (UK)

Arabella Slinger (UK)

Julian Thomas (UK)

Vincent Piguot (Switzerland)

 

PolarExplorers team

Messner route

Keith Heger (CA guide) 

Ian Evans (CA) 

Andy Styles (UK) 

Bradley Cross (UK)

 

Assisted Supported

 

Tractor expedition (Novo to GSP)

Matty McNair (US, leader)

Manon Ossevoort (NL)

Sarah McNair-Landry (CA)

 

Non-coastal start:

Outer Edge snow sailer (AU)

return journey

Polar Plateau South of Novo to GSP and possible return via POI to Novo Base

Kristan Ficher (leader)

Charles Werb

Adrian McCallum

Jon Moody

 

 

ExplorersWeb Interviews

 

ExWeb interview with Are Johansen, "snow is the best surface for long journeys”

 

ExWeb interview with Frédéric Dion, invention and modification for the South Pole of Inaccessibility

 

2014 South Pole expedition list

 

ExWeb interview with Ian Evans, skier with PolarExplorers on Messner Route

 

ExWeb interview with Newall Hunter, solo South Pole skier: "pretty hectic last preparations"

 

French married couple and Norwegian adventurer for South Pole crossing: ExWeb interview with couple

 

ExWeb interview with Tractor Girl, Manon Ossevoort: tractor passed tests and arrived in Cape Town

 

ExWeb post South Pole interview with Fagan couple

 

Lessons from a yachtswoman: Paula Reid to ski to the South Pole

 

Geoff Wilson’s Top 5 South Pole Tips

 

ExWeb interview with Faysal Hanneche, "I learned to be patient on Antarctica"

 

Rules and Regulations in No-Man's Land: ExWeb interview with ALE's Steve Jones

 

Mount Sidley, Antarctica’s highest volcano accessible to climbers

 

Polar Technology

 

Rules and Regulations in No-Man's Land: ExWeb interview with ALE's Steve Jones

 

Polar Tech Week Roundup: 2014/2015 Recommendations

 

Your Smart Phone going Global: Review of Iridium Go

 

ExWeb Special: 2014 Polar Tech Roundtable Conference

 

HumanEdgeTech Expedition Technology (e.g.CONTACT software)

 

Related

 

2014-14 South Pole list - Updated

 

AdventureStats and Rules of Adventure

 

Antarctica news bits

 

Mission to Mars: Stage 2 Report

 

A journey to the South Pole in a wheelchair

 

Antarctica video trilogy

 

Video: Second 2012-13 Ilyushin-76 flight lands at Union Glacier, Antarctica

 

NASA Worldview

 

Current Polar Sea Ice Situation (Sept 2014)

 

Animated map of global weather conditions

 

New satellite map of Antarctica freely available

 

Antarctic ski/climb/pole/science Logistic Operators

 

Adventure Network International (ANI and ALE)

 

Antarctic Logistics Centre International (ALCI and TAC)

 

 

Gateway port Cape Town, South Africa: 

To ALCI /TAC base camp Novolazarevskaya / Novo 

70° 46’37”S, 011° 49’26”E 

 

Gateway port Punta Arenas, Chile, South America: 

To ALE/ANI base camp, Union Glacier 

79° 45'S, 083° 14'W

 

Hercules Inlet is located at 80°S near Union Glacier, 1130 km from the Geographic South Pole.

The Ronne-Filchner Ice Shelf (Messner) start is 890 km in a straight line from the Pole.

The bottom of the Leverett Glacier, at the Ross Ice Shelf, is located at about 85ºS, a distance of 550 km from the Geographic South Pole.

Axel Heiberg Glacier start is also located at the Ross Ice Shelf and 535 km in a straight line from the South Pole.

 

According to the Rules of Adventure, to claim a “solo" achievement, requires an unassisted status - therefore no supplies carried by pilots or car drivers, or anything (food, fuel, etc) received from any person along the way. A solo person may be wind supported (kites/sails). Note that the Polar Rules were compiled by early Norwegian and British Polar explorers (not exclusively ExplorersWeb) and are maintained today by the current community of veteran polar skiers.

 

1 nautical mile (nm) = 1.852 km

1 nm = 1.151 miles

1 knot = 1.852 km/h

1 degree of Latitude is 110 km / 60 nm / 70 miles

Sastrugi are hard snow bumps and can be as high as 10 feet

A nunatak is a top of a mountain visible above the snow surface.

 

South Pole of Inaccessibility (POI)

2011-12 position: 

S82°06.696, E055°01.951

Geographic South Pole (GSP): 90 degrees South

 

 

#polar

#southpole2014

#southpole2014-15

#antarctica

#expeditionlist

#fredericdion

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Frederic: "What is an extreme adventurer doing between two conferences?"
courtesy Frederick Dion, SOURCE
Frederic's dog training with him.
courtesy Frederick Dion, SOURCE
Frederick kite skiing.
courtesy Frederick Dion, SOURCE
Frederick's preparations on video.
courtesy Frederick Dion, SOURCE
Antarctica ski and kite routes.
courtesy Map compiled by ExplorersWeb, SOURCE
Eric McNair-Landry: “It was odd to encounter; such an icon in such a vast and empty land, for one it felt like stepping back in time, or to a paralleled universe.” In the image, Eric and Sebastian at the South Pole of Inaccessibility with Lenin’s bust.
courtesy Sebastian Copeland, SOURCE
"At 6km we spotted a dot on the horizon," reported team n2i from the POI in 2007. "As we edged closer, it began to form into a noticeable pillar, an outline.....a bust! With the realization that against all the odds Lenin was in fact still around to greet us we all burst into uncontrollable shouts and laughter. Live image over Contact 4.0 of the Lenin statue and the team's automated Contact 4.0 GEO map, courtesy of team n2i (click to enlarge).
courtesy Team n2i, SOURCE
"Suddenly from out the clouds a roar as the plane swoops over our camp - the relentless wind drowning out the approaching buzz until the last moment." Live image over Contact 4.0 of the plane approaching the POI, courtesy of team n2i.
courtesy Team n2i, SOURCE
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