Oli Broom update; Oztralian Outback

Oli Broom update; Oztralian Outback

Posted: Nov 05, 2010 07:37 am EDT

"The road, if thats what it was, got worse throughout the day. I had to get off and push when the sand got too deep. I fell off twice, once cutting my foot on a sharp stone and using my first aid kit for the first time since Africa. Progress was slow. The temperature rose to 47 degrees in the sun."

Dirt roads, crocodiles and bull dust

Since we last heard from Oli Broom in the middle of July, he has made his way down through Thailand, Malaysia, Indonesia and into Australia. His final country. Brisbane is his goal. Only 1700 kilometers of Australian bush and outback remaining. His trip through this vast continent has been very reflective, dominated by dirt roads, heat, flies,eternal head winds, bull dust, loneliness and worries of crocodiles. All those hours by himself on the corrugated roads, is hours of reminiscing. The favorite past time of all long distance cyclists.

Reminiscing

Oli writes on his blog, when he saw a road sign of the remaining kilometers to Brisbane, he reflected on his trip:

"I thought about everything Ive done since leaving London", he starts; "From the young Frenchman who gave me his grandmothers vegetables on my only morning in France to the Eritrean refugees we stayed with in Khartoum; the German mountain biker who set me a treasure hunt on my way out of Frankfurt; my first evening in Turkey cycling into the former capital, Edirne to the sound of the sunset call to prayer; pedaling into Dhaka amongst 300,000 cycle rickshaws; my first view of the Bay of Bengal; four weeks of getting naked to dry my clothes in countless Turkish petrol stations; dusk encounters with packs of wild dogs on the Anatolian plateau; sleeping in army barracks, police stations and shops; tasting countless national dishes; listening to 12 lions devour a bush pig outside my banda in Kenya; cycling out of Damascus in the snow; climbing Mount Longonot, high above the Great Rift Valley; sleeping under the milky way in the Nubian Desert; practising my laughing club moves with the Calcutta Communist Party on election day (they lost); dancing with a TV stars bodyguard in a Khartoum music store; negotiating Ramadan in Malaysia; Aussie steak and Bundaberg Rum in Jakarta; sailing into Darwin harbour after seven days at sea; reading books under moonlit outback skies and thats just for starters."

1700 kilometers to go

Right now, he is waiting for a friend to arrive. To share the dusty roads and fend off reckless drivers. His solo trip has reached its end.

.Oli Broom (29) grew up in Cookham, Berkshire (UK) and went to school in Buckinghamshire and then Oxford. In 2003, I graduated from Durham University, where I studied French and Spanish.

His Cycling To The Ashes journey has 3 very clear aims he says on his website:

1. Beginning on 10 October 2009, to cycle approximately 25,000km solo and unsupported from Lord's Cricket Ground, London, to Brisbane Cricket Ground ("The Gabba") in time to see England play Australia in the first Ashes Test Match of the 2010/11 series, in November 2010.

2. To play, promote and teach cricket in schools, youth projects and clubs in up to 28 countries that I cycle through on my route.

3. To raise £100,000 for my two chosen charities the British Neurological Research Trust and The Lord's Taverners.

Olis route since he started October 10, 2009 in England from Lords Cricket Ground to Dover where he took the ferry to Northern France: England, France, Belgium, Luxembourg, Germany, Austria, Slovakia, Hungary, Serbia, Bulgaria, Turkey, Syria, Jordan, Egypt, Sudan, Kenya, India, Bangladesh and Thailand. Malaysia, Indonesia and a boat ride to Darwin, Australia lie ahead.

From Darwin Ill pedal towards the red centre on the Stuart Highway. I will turn off at Tennant Creek where Ill cycle east towards Mount Isa and Longreach. Brisbane will be in my sights now, as I pedal my hardest to reach the city for the beginning of the Ashes at the end of November!

Oli is using a P50, Solar Feather and Survivor to charge his equipment to update his website.

#Trek






The road, if thats what it was, got worse throughout the day. I had to get off and push when the sand got too deep. I fell off twice, once cutting my foot on a sharp stone and using my first aid kit for the first time since Africa. Progress was slow. The temperature rose to 47 degrees in the sun.
Image by Oli Broom courtesy Oli Broom, SOURCE
"I thought about everything Ive done since leaving London", he starts; "From the young Frenchman who gave me his grandmothers vegetables on my only morning in France to the Eritrean refugees we stayed with in Khartoum."
Image by Oli Broom courtesy Oli Broom, SOURCE
Travelling by bicycle gives you time to take in buildings and rivers, the earth and the sky and I miss it already.
Image by Oli Broom courtesy Oli Broom, SOURCE
Oztralian steaks!
Image by Oli Broom courtesy Oli Broom, SOURCE
×