Expedition in East Africa from the lowest to the highest

Expedition in East Africa from the lowest to the highest

Posted: Nov 17, 2010 03:55 pm EST

Kyle Henning sent an email to ExWeb which said:

"I do all my own PR, and Im new to it all. Can you write something about my Expedition?"

Refreshing Peace Corp Volunteer

It was something refreshing over Peace Corps volunteer Kyle Hennings email to ExWeb. It felt genuine. Warm. Big hearted. Unselfish. It was breathing with joy and love for Africa. He is trying to raise funds for 50 disadvantaged children in Ethiopia to help them get educational support and providing meals. To be able to assist them with this chance for a healthy life, he wants to do an expedition from the lowest point on the African continent to the highest.

"Beginning in January, 2011, at the shore of Lake Assal, Djibouti (155m below sea level), I will bicycle more than 3,000km through six countries to the base of Mt. Kilimanjaro, Tanzania and trek to the summit of Uhuru Peak (5,895m above sea level)" , he tells ExWeb.

Currently in Ethiopia preparing

All supplies for the bicycle tour and the mountain trek will be carried on the bicycle. Food will be purchased locally in towns and cities along the way, and water will be purchased or filtered from local sources. He tells ExWeb:

"My training regiment has been designed to create conditions as close to the real expedition as possible" , he tells ExWeb, "I am living in Ethiopia currently, I
know the road conditions, and other variables like dangerous drivers, scarce water sources, scorching sun, language barriers, and rock-throwing children are all as real as they get. I do training rides with the bike packed the same as it will be for the real
expedition. For me, its not just about physical conditioning, but also about testing my gear, learning to pack efficiently, and getting used to the balance of a fully-loaded bike on rough roads."

Passing through an unstable area of the world.

Now this is a very politically unstable area of the world, but Kyle is full of the freshness which comes with being new to the game and being young. He doesn´t linger on possible dangers and he is training hard.

"I ride the bike almost every day, and try to do one big ride of 50km or more on the weekends. I run 3-4 times per week, ending my run at the top of the biggest hill in town. In addition, I do calisthenics and body-weight exercises. I need my body to be lean and strong, but
not bulky, so I focus a lot on cardio workouts and total-body training. Luckily, I can eat a very balanced diet with plenty of protein in Ethiopia. The local food is perfect for endurance training, and may be why Ethiopia produces some of the fastest runners in the
world."

Understanding East Africa.

To be able to enjoy this journey to its full, one needs experience from Africa, which Kyle has. A big advantage.

"I feel very fortunate to be able to train in Africa for this
expedition" , Kyle says;"I am also at an advantage since I can speak some of the language in Ethiopia, and have contacts in every country I will visit. While I cant possibly prepare for everything, living in Ethiopia for the last 2 years has prepared me for a lot of what east Africa can throw at me."

Kyle Henning is currently serving as a Peace Corps Volunteer in Bahir Dar, Ethiopia, Kyle has been spending the last two years improving the communitys
HIV/AIDS Services Network and teaching Life Skills classes to young adults at the New Day Childrens Centre. The expedition is a fundraiser for the New Day Childrens Centre in Bahir Dar, which helps
50 disadvantaged children through educational support and providing meals. The NDCC is raising money to purchase a new compound that will
enable them to serve even more children. Donations can be made athttp://uk.virginmoneygiving.com/charity-web/charity/finalCharityHomepage.action?charityId=1001177 or by visiting the NDCC website http://ndccethiopia.org.uk

The route:

Djibouti: Starting at the shore of Lake Assal, heading east toward
Djibouti City, then south to the southern border with Ethiopia.

Ethiopia: South to Dire Dawa, east to Harar, then west to Addis Ababa.
Traveling southwest to Arba Minch and the Omo Valley on the border
with Kenya, crossing at Omorate.

Kenya: Following the western shore of Lake Turkana south to Lodwar,
then southeast to Nairobi for visa purposes. Then traveling northeast
to the border with Uganda, crossing at Malaba.

Uganda: Following the northern shore of Lake Victoria to Kampala.
Continuing onward to Rwanda, crossing at Katuna.

Rwanda: Heading south through Kigali, and southeast to the border with
Tanzania, crossing south of Kibungo.

Tanzania: Following east-bound roads across the north of the country,
but dipping south to avoid some game reservations where cycling is not
permitted. Northeast to Arusha, then due east to Moshi and the base of
Mt. Kilimanjaro.

Kilimanjaro: Standard seven-day route to the summit of Uhuru Peak.

#Trek #topstory





"I feel very fortunate to be able to train in Africa for this expedition. I am also at an advantage since I can speak some of the language in Ethiopia, and have contacts in every country I will visit. While I cant possibly prepare for everything, living in Ethiopia for the last 2 years has prepared me for a lot of what east Africa can throw at me."
Image by Kyle Henning courtesy Kyle Henning, SOURCE
I am living in Ethiopia currently, I know the road conditions, and other variables like dangerous drivers, scarce water sources, scorching sun, language barriers, and rock-throwing children are all as real as they get.
Image by Kyle Henning courtesy Kyle Henning, SOURCE
For me, its not just about physical conditioning, but also about testing my gear, learning to pack efficiently, and getting used to the balance of a fully-loaded bike on rough roads.
Image by Kyle Henning courtesy Kyle Henning, SOURCE
Beginning in January, 2011, at the shore of Lake Assal, Djibouti (155m below sea level), I will bicycle more than 3,000km through six countries to the base of Mt. Kilimanjaro, Tanzania and trek to the summit of Uhuru Peak. 5895 m above sea level
Image by Kyle Henning courtesy Kyle Henning, SOURCE
Kyle Henning is currently serving as a Peace Corps Volunteer in Bahir Dar, Ethiopia, Kyle has been spending the last two years improving the communitys

HIV/AIDS Services Network and teaching Life Skills classes to young adults at the New Day Childrens Centre.
Image by Kyle Henning courtesy Kyle Henning, SOURCE

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