K2: The Fallen Five

K2 Karakorum
Atanas Skatov (top left), Ali Sadpara (top right), John Snorri, (bottom left), Sergi Mingote (middle), JP Mohr (bottom right).

Despite the successful first winter summit of K2 earlier in the season, the Savage Mountain has lived up to its foreboding reputation with the deaths of Sergi Mingote and Atanas Skatov, and the disappearance of Ali Sadpara, John Snorri, and JP Mohr.

For their chance at few fleeting moments atop the second highest mountain in the world, all five have paid the ultimate price. The whys and hows will be unpacked in the coming weeks, but for now, let’s simply learn a little more about these five people.

Sergi Mingote

Photo: Ajuntament de Parets del Vallès

The Spaniard was the first to perish this season, after falling down an ice ramp while descending from Camp 1 on January 16. He was 49.

Mingote was vastly experienced in the Greater Ranges and had climbed seven 8,000m peaks without supplemental oxygen during 2018-2019: Manaslu, K2, Broad Peak, Nanga Parbat, Lhotse, Gasherbrum II, and Dhaulagiri. He also summited Everest in 2001 and 2003.

K2 was part of the Spaniard’s quest for the fastest oxygen-less summit of all 14 8,000’ers, dubbed the “14×1000 Catalonia Project. Why 1,000? Mingote had wanted to tick off the remaining seven mountains within 1,000 days, but the pandemic derailed his efforts.

Outside of the mountains, Mingote was an adventuring renaissance man who had also completed Ironman and Ultraman triathlons, swum the Strait of Gibraltar, crossed the Sahara and Gobi deserts, and cycled 7,000km across Europe on a peak-bagging trip in 2020.

it doesn’t stop there. Mingote was previously mayor of a town in Catalonia, held a
a Master’s degree in International Cooperation and Management, and served as the president of the Onat Foundation for social inclusion through sport.


Atanas Skatov

Photo: Anadolu Agency

The ever-smiling Bulgarian took a fatal fall near Camp 3 on February 5. He was 42 and a father of one son.

Like Mingote, Skatov was a man of many talents. He dedicated his early life to academia, earning a Bachelor’s, Masters and PhD degrees. His doctoral studies focused on agricultural science.

It wasn’t until 2010, aged 32, that Skatov first hit the mountains, when he trekked Bulgaria’s longest mountain trail. After completing the same trail twice more, Skatov hit the high mountains without any real training or experience. Remarkably, he racked up 11 8,000m summits: Manalsu, Annapurna I, Dhaulagiri, Makalu, Gasherbrum I and II,Lhotse, Everest (twice), Cho Oyu, and Kangchenjunga.

Despite a somewhat tenuous claim of being the first Vegan to climb the various 8,000’ers, Skatov was undoubtedly highly motivated and talented. He completed three of his 8,000m summits without Sherpa support (Cho Oyu and Gasherburm I and II) and did a number of others alpine-style and in quick succession. For example, in 2016 after knocking off Annapurna I and getting high on Dhaulagiri, the Bulgarian rapidly summited Makalu, after only a single day at Base Camp (and 94 hours on the mountain in total).

Skatov had also completed the Seven Summits and climbed Denali solo and alpine-style.


Ali Sadpara

Photo: Alex Txikon

Arguably the most revered and well-known of the five, we must emphasize that his status and that of his two companions is still just missing. Only last week he celebrated his 46th birthday at Base Camp. Sajid, 22, is his only son. His wife’s name is Fatima.

Although he was officially employed by John Snorri as a “high-altitude porter,” Ali Sadpara is actually one of the strongest high-altitude climbers in the world. But the high mountains haven’t been the Pakistani’s first challenge in life: Eight of his 11 siblings died during birth/childhood. This was not an uncommon occurrence in his home village of Sadpara in northern Pakistan, where many children succumb to disease. Such was the impact of these deaths on his mother Fiza, that she breastfed Sadpara until age six to ensure that he had the best nutrition and best chance of survival.

After a childhood spent exploring the local alpine pastures, Sadpara started low-level portering work, toting heavy loads to Base Camps at K2, Broad Peak, and the Gasherbrums. But after a near-death experience portering for the Pakistani Army in the conflict zone (with India) on the Siachen Glacier, Sadpara changed his focus to high-altitude work.

Between 2006 and 2015, Sadpara climbed Gasherburm II, Spatnik, Nanga Parbat (twice), and Gasherbrum I. In 2015, Sadpara made an unsuccessful attempt at Nanga Parbat in winter with Alex Txikon and Daniele Nardi. But a year later, he was part of the historic first winter ascent of that mountain with Txikon and Simone Moro. In total, Sadpara summited Nanga Parbat four times.

Further notable summits between 2016-2021 included Broad Peak, Pumori (first winter ascent), K2, Lhotse, Makalu, and Manaslu.

Alpinist magazine provided an accurate (and sad) assessment of Sadpara’s career in 2019. Hugely strong and talented, but always at the service of others:

For professional mountaineers climbing by some variation of “fair means,” it’s compromising to hire a high-altitude worker. Ali’s role was that of an unpaid “equal partner.” In practice, though, he often led the way; he earned the use of his gear through labor; and if the others quit, he was expected to quit, too.

Indeed on the day of that historic first winter summit of Nanga Parbat, Ali waited a few metres below the top for Moro to catch up so they could reach it together. Moro was, however, hugely pleased with Sadpara, later remarking that “Ali is to Nanga Parbat what Tenzing was to Everest.”

As Tenzing was to Nepalis, Ali Sadpara is a hero to many across Pakistan. It is ironic that 10 days ago, as Sadpara waited in Base Camp for the weather to clear for this fateful push, the Pakistani government finally committed to supporting his attempts to climb the rest of the 8,000m peaks, freeing him from servitude to others for the first time.

JP Mohr

Photo: Dario Rodriguez/Desnivel

The soft-spoken Chilean climber, currently missing with Ali Sadpara and John Snorri, is 33 years old and has three children.

Mohr began climbing at 17, before launching a career in architecture. His first trip to the high mountains was Annapurna in 2017, which he climbed alongside Sebastián Rojas, Alberto Zerain, and Jonathan García. They climbed a variant of the normal French route, which involved pitches of 70-degree ice.

Mohr went on to climb Manaslu in 2018 and in 2019, he made a rapid double-header of Lhotse and Everest without oxygen in just six days (a record). That autumn, Mohr also became the first Chilean to summit Dhaulagiri without oxygen or Sherpa support.


John Snorri

Photo: John Snorri

The missing Icelandic climber is 47 years old and has a wife, Lina, and six children.

Growing up in the countryside of southwest Iceland, Snorri has always been active in the outdoors. He later took up mountaineering as a way to test his physical limits and indulge his lifelong passion for nature.

Snorri started with Mont Blanc in 2011, before climbing Ama Dablam in 2015, Elbrus in 2016, and Lhotse, K2, and Broad Peak in 2017. Minor summits of the Matterhorn and other peaks in the European Alps followed, before he returned to the big mountains with a summit of Manaslu in 2019. Last winter, Snorri was part of Mingma G’s aborted attempt on Winter K2.

Although he was often a guided client, Snorri only started his climbing career on Mont Blanc a decade ago. Since then, he’s achieved a lot, culminating in this winter summit attempt on K2.

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About the Author

Ash Routen

Ash Routen

Ash is an outdoor and adventure writer from the UK. He juggles a day job as a public health scientist with a second career in outdoor writing.

His words have featured in national newspapers, international magazines, and on various websites. Major bylines include Financial Times, Daily Telegraph, Porsche, Outside Magazine, Rock and Ice, and Red Bull.

He holds two degrees in Exercise and Health Sciences, and a PhD in Public Health.

His areas of expertise are polar expeditions, mountaineering, hiking, and adventure travel. In his spare time Ash enjoys going on small independent sledding expeditions, outdoor photography, and reading adventure literature.

Read more at www.ashrouten.com or follow Ash via @ashrouten on Twitter and Instagram.

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UMK
UMK
24 days ago

Sorry guys and may the families and loved one’s have courage and strength to overcome these losses.

“K2 has its own plans”

0
Kurt
Kurt
24 days ago

At least 10 small children are without fathers after this…how does one reconcile it?

0
Stay-at-home mountaineer
Stay-at-home mountaineer
24 days ago
Reply to  Kurt

Selfishness and ego.

+1
john
john
24 days ago

Some men want to push their physical limits and have dreams and goals. Something a coward such as yourself could never imagine which is why you try to bring down others for things you are too weak and and scared to try yourself. Typical internet coward.

+2
jams
jams
24 days ago
Reply to  john

Indulging your ego when you have 6 children to support is not moral in my opinion. I gave up Alpinisme when I had my first child. I have three and would not dream of climbing big mountains while they are under 18. A fathers job is to protect his family at all costs.

+3
Gabriela Fields
Gabriela Fields
22 days ago
Reply to  jams

I looked at John’s FB page—4 of the 6 children are still young, the other 2 are adults. The younger kids are 2 toddlers and 2 teens. Selfish indeed!

0
Sean
Sean
24 days ago
Reply to  john

It takes a true coward to be okay with what these men did. Your dreams should include you being alive for your children! A coward is someone who leaves his children fatherless. John Snorri had six children, most of whom are young! What that man did was selfish and I wanna use the word ‘retarded’. If somebody were to accuse me of being stupid, I can always say “Yeah, but at least I’m not John Snorri.”

0
Tina
Tina
20 hours ago
Reply to  john

And some men actually give up dangerous things when they have children no matter how much they really want to do it. Doing what you want at the expense of other people no matter the cost to them are the cowards.

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Khan
Khan
22 days ago

Stay at home, wipe your shit is all you can do

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Lana
Lana
22 days ago
Reply to  Khan

Alex Goldfarb lost his life on Broad Peak this January. My family knew him and his children. We thought the same thoughts about father’s responsibilities toward his children, and then I had read about one famous rock climber who died in fall at age of 31. One of his friend said that for this climber to say to stop doing that is the same as to say to bird to stop flying. We should not be judgemental talking about those who are not with us any more.

+1
Eddy De Wilde
Eddy De Wilde
22 days ago
Reply to  Lana

We are all born with dreams we want to realize. Being careful about what we do is our only option. Even if we are risk adverse, is that going to guarantee a long life? Do we want a world where no one does anything adventurous? Being a parent and being adventurous are not mutually exclusive. Let’s just make judgement calls for our own lives and allow others who love their wives, husbands and children to make their own calls

+1
James
James
24 days ago
Reply to  Kurt

It’s the “Winter K2” part that I struggle with. The risk is just to great

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Ron
Ron
24 days ago
Reply to  James

Happy to be corrected but I don’t recall any climber has died from previous winter K2 seasons except for Vitaly Gorelik (who actually died at BC from freak pneumonia). If you’re very strong, it becomes a manageable risk in the same way as commercial clients on avalanche prone Manaslu, for example.

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Lucius
Lucius
24 days ago
Reply to  Kurt

I wanted to ask the same thing. How can someone engage in such a dangerous feat if he has 6 children. Those little hearts are now broken. Just like “Stay-at-home mountaineer” said: selfishness and ego.
Maybe K2 should be closed during winter.

+1
epic
epic
21 days ago
Reply to  Lucius

you are right. but how is it selfish. they want to test their abiities. they didnt have to do K2, thats right. but its not selfish

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saaas
saaas
24 days ago

Matko boska, Snorri 6 dzieci, Mohr 3 dzieci a oni wycieczki na ileś miesiecy albo i na zawsze przy malutkich szkrabach?

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Guest
Guest
24 days ago

May Allah give patience to their families

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Natalie
Natalie
24 days ago

My heart breaks reading about the fact Ali was often employed and had to earn the use of his gear, when sponsorship is thrown at lesser men just because of their ability to PR themselves on YouTube or whatever. One thing that matters is that Ali would have been so happy to know his son got himself safely down. My thoughts are with these men and their loved ones.

+2
Kurt
Kurt
24 days ago
Reply to  Natalie

Ali’s comments re climbing:

“Many climb for money, which isn’t that much but it sustains people. However, not many of my fellow porters want to climb. If they had better opportunities, they would quit climbing.”

“Honestly if you ask me, I would not want my children to work in this field. My sons are studying, one of them is in college, and has simply refused to climb. I want to be able to earn enough to provide for my family.”

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Mobasher
Mobasher
23 days ago
Reply to  Natalie

You’re right, it’s a shameful act to be precise, blamed on our current government and all previous governments that they mostly fancy overpaid cricketers in sponsorships. Holding retarded tournaments like the PSL which only focuses on money, betting, and match-fixing (spotfixing). We celebrate fame instead of helping true heros like Imtiaz, Muhammad Ali Sadpara and many such greats from the past that went unnoticed. I’m still hoping for a miracle for the 3 of them.

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Father Figure
Father Figure
24 days ago

My condolences and thoughts to everyone involved. I know I’ll get flamed for this but reading about Snorri’s 6 children, JP’s 3 children and Skatanov’s one child leads me to think why people (especially those with young families) put themselves into these situations? Think about the wives and children who will now have to live the rest of their life without a fatherly figure. I can understand that Ali Sadpara was doing it because it was his source of income but for the others involved – kind of selfish, no?

+2
Trish
Trish
24 days ago
Reply to  Father Figure

Selfish? Not really. Think if it this way…it’s not like these people woke up one day and announced to their wives and children that they going to go climb K2 in the winter. I’m sure if that happened everyone would be screaming NOOOO! But these guys were highly trained and highly skilled. They’ve climbed other mountains, survived other risks and had many other adventures. They were confident in their abilities. They are experts. From the perspective of a wife it’s no different than being married to a pilot, actor, musician, attorney, or construction worker. Their are risks and everything. Your… Read more »

Kurt
Kurt
24 days ago
Reply to  Trish

I am curious how the kids would react to this explanation. One day they will make this assessment and judgement. There is a Polish film (by Kubarska I think, played at the Banff MFF) about the children (now grown up) of the victims of the 1986 K2 disaster. They went back to K2 with the film maker and commented on their side of the experience of loosing a parent. Very insightful… This is a great tragedy for all involved…Also read the book Regions of the Heart about Alison Hargraves. Her story and the impact on her son Tom Ballard was… Read more »

Blabla
Blabla
24 days ago
Reply to  Trish

Nah, it is selfish all the way through. Plus they were not as expert as you think. Of all those who perished, Ali was the only one with winter experience on an 8000er. The rest are mostly athletes that were mainly peak-bagging on fixed lines and kind of far from the skills and experience of the guys you could really call experts. (not saying this is good or bad, just pointing out the fact)

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Ron
Ron
24 days ago
Reply to  Blabla

Your argument is irrelevant when someone like Nims makes it; no winter experience and their resumes entirely made of peak bagging using oxygen and/or fixed lines. What you really need is a crapload of money to fund a big team, determination, strength and luck (no SST people bothering his sleep!). Nothing against Nims, just stating the facts. Conversely, the most experienced people (Ali and Tamara) did not make it.

At the end of the day, what likely killed these people were acts of God (the 3) or simple mistakes when changing ropes (Sergi, Atanas).

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Blabla
Blabla
23 days ago
Reply to  Ron

I don’t know what your point is. Nims summited along with an extremely strong 9 men team of Sherpas with huge experience in rope fixing, high altitude rescue, taking customers to the top and what not. Those who perished, except of Ali, were pretty much their usual customers. And that’s exactly what I meant.

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epic
epic
23 days ago
Reply to  Blabla

really. skatov summitted everest two times. resarch more. he was first vegan on everest.

+1
Blabla
Blabla
22 days ago
Reply to  epic

Yes, he also summited 9 other 8000ers, everytime as a client of a commercial expedition. He was not an alpinist in the true sense of the word but more an adventure mountaineer, which I’m not saying is bad.. All I’m saying there are way more qualified people in the field that should go under “experts”, such as the sherpa team that summited.

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epic
epic
21 days ago
Reply to  Blabla

well he was an alpinist cuz i know someone who knew him
and he told me

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Gabriela Fields
Gabriela Fields
20 days ago
Reply to  epic

Another silly and stupid record—WTF is the “first vegan” on a summit?? What’s next? Every conceivable record has been broken, now we have to contrive something like “vegan”! LOL

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Gabriela Fields
Gabriela Fields
22 days ago
Reply to  Blabla

Very true. John Sorri, for example, wanted to climb all 14 8000ers. From his website I see that he’s only achieved 4 or 5 so far, and that at age 47. He started very late in the game. That ambition most likely killed him, and left a bunch of kids fatherless. Not sure how he can support the 4 minors (of his 6 kids), as no insurance company will insure high-risk climbing deaths. Oh well, there is always “gofundme” to support the poor widow & children…

0
epic
epic
21 days ago
Reply to  Blabla

not as expert as u think??? i thought that A.Skatov summited the 7 summits

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Tom
Tom
24 days ago
Reply to  Trish

I agree only to a point and find this view extreme.

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Jackie Stratton
Jackie Stratton
23 days ago
Reply to  Trish

….. lovely heart warming reply – it’s an amazing tough path to take in life to be a mountaineer but live with someone who feels that way and you will understand the consequences and their desires and aims and wishes – I feel for those who have lost loved ones but only choose to love and live and share your life with them if you know you will accept what may lay ahead xx

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Gaby
Gaby
18 days ago
Reply to  Trish

Yeah, yeah…it’s always the so-called “experts” that get killed. Mother Nature is stronger than man, and if the mountain decides it wants yo win over human hubris, it will win. Of course it us different if one has a job that may include some danger, versus the much more selfish need to “fulfill one’s dream”. If you want to climb, then maybe you should not make children.

+2
Blabla
Blabla
24 days ago

Really makes you question if it’s worth it… What a tragedy. My heart is crying for Ali and his family. Seeing his son in that interview really breaks my heart ;( ;( I hope he smiled at the end knowing his boy got down safely ;(

+1
Walid Hamadeh
Walid Hamadeh
24 days ago

Lets celebrate everyone’s life that had perished or still missing while they were on a quest to fulfill their noble objectives. They have passed on their spiritual flame doing something they LOVED.

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Kurt
Kurt
24 days ago
Reply to  Walid Hamadeh

Tell it to their kids… See what they say

+2
Uttam
Uttam
24 days ago
Reply to  Kurt

Ya, these kids’ mountain climbing dads were absentee dads – as they were mostly away training or climbing in far flung corners of the world, when not working their normal jobs. How much the kids will miss their dads will depend on their level of emotional attachment to the latter. Mountaineers in general don’t come across as emotionally intelligent people (hiding emotions, vulnerabilities, and pains is their forte and survival strategy) in the macho world of mountaineering. Now the kids will probably be raised by their moms along with surrogate dads or step dads to be. May be the governments… Read more »

jams
jams
24 days ago
Reply to  Uttam

Stop trying to quash freedom, you nor any government should have the right to set a boundary to who can or cannot climb a mountain based on your personal affairs.

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Bulgarian seaman
Bulgarian seaman
24 days ago

So sorry, for them 😢 Kind request: Please journalist’s here with all related contacts within alpine community, please investigate what had happened to A.Skatov, show us his sherpa, his comments, what went wrong? Kind of route cause analysis? In fact before him several people passed the same place. The sherpa explanations were very limited regarding accident, I was not able to read nowhere his comments. Why I am asking for: Small amount of people have been familiarized why he has no pictures from his 1st Everest summit- because the companion took the pictures on top start blackmailing him for additional… Read more »

Samson Simon Sharaf
24 days ago

From a plume of cloud on ascent day till now, weather at K2 remains bad. Hardluck it seems. Lets pray

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Taimur Khan
Taimur Khan
24 days ago

I have been reading the comments, some of them a tad disparaging of the fallen and the missing heroes. Its a fair point that some of them have young kids but that is no reason to call them selfish or motivated by ego. Possibly people who have never been alone on a mountain before have no means of understanding. I was caught alone on a hill i was climbing at the age of 12, caught at a point from where i could go niether up or down when darkness was coming fast. I had to jump sideways across a void… Read more »

Craig
Craig
24 days ago
Reply to  Taimur Khan

Get your head out of your own ego..

“Was it worth it for them?” – You couldn’t be missing the point more if you tried.

Was it worth it for the children growing up without a father and the wives left to grow old alone? – Now you are asking the right question. It’s never all about you

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Eddy De Wilde
Eddy De Wilde
22 days ago
Reply to  Craig

would you be more accepting if climbers became good little office jocks and got killed going to work? Same outcome. Who rolls the dice?

+1
Explore
Explore
24 days ago

To people criticizing this climb while having a family: this site is called Explorersweb – didn’t you know that: (1) exploration is statistically speaking more dangerous than many other activities, but simultaneously (2) almost every explorer has a family? Sure, it’s questionable if this term applies to John Snorri, who’s been mostly doing, from what I can see, high-altitude tourism (almost all peaks he’s done are plain easy and nothing new, and I think all the ones before his winter K2 attempt were done in summer, tourist/sport-style – but do correct me if I’m wrong – but this is another… Read more »

Victor
Victor
24 days ago
Reply to  Explore

Beside the point about kids, I’d say James Cook did a different type of exploration. Not following a known route to some place that has already been found. Not saying climbing K2 is easy, but different.

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Blabla
Blabla
20 days ago
Reply to  Explore

Well, most people, me including, agree with you, that even leaving your family behind is justified in the name of exploration, but dragging yourself up on a fixed line that somebody set for you, what climbing 8000ers has become these days, is no exploration. Its a selfish desire to put yourself on the top.

0
Craig
Craig
24 days ago

Climbing K2 in winter is pretty inspiring. But you know what is more inspiring?! The father who laid aside his own ego to be there for his family and kids, who decided he would live for something and not die for something. It’s not enough to say ‘it’s who I am, it’s what makes me come alive’. In doing what makes you happy you have devastated multiple lives – that is not love – that is the ultimate selfish act. I love adventure but I feel absolutely no inspiration from these attempts. Risk your own life for the ultimate mountaineering… Read more »

Explore
Explore
24 days ago
Reply to  Craig

Well, I have a surprise for you, around 450,000 people died since John Snorri’s disappearance (150,000 deaths per day, the 2017 rate) 🙂 Assuming (very conservatively) 1% of them were fathers with young children, that gives us 4,500 young fathers dead in just a bunch of days (hundreds of thousands per year). Oh well, in that light, it does not see so much horrifying that a few folks per year go out for winter exploration, but well, that requires some math…

0
Craig
Craig
24 days ago
Reply to  Explore

Funny I should have to clarify this from my comment – I am not suggesting that fathers are immortal and will never die. Death and taxes are the only things we can be certain of in this life.

I am talking about priorities – who did you put first in your life? Your own ambition, your own happiness, your own ego? Or did you live for something other than yourself?

0
Explore
Explore
24 days ago
Reply to  Craig

That’s a wrong way to frame the whole problem (there is a right way, see below). Every activity is in a way dangerous. Sure, some are more spectacular, like scaling K2 in winter. But many others ‘standard’ ones are also bad, despite being non-spectacular. If you work stressed at a company ‘to provide more finances for your kids’ (so common these days), you indirectly cause distress as well – your health deteriorates (it will impact you and your family as well), you may often develop psychological problems, etc.. Also saying ‘it’s a hobby vs job’ is not the correct way… Read more »

Craig
Craig
24 days ago
Reply to  Explore

What a long way of adding nothing to the discussion. Sure you can die crossing the road, working in an office, or doing pretty much anything.
You can’t live your life avoiding anything that could be dangerous. But a part of maturing into an adult (& dealing appropriately with responsibility that involves other people) is the ability to make judgements and to analyse just HOW dangerous something is.

K2 in winter is more dangerous.. it just is

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Tom
Tom
24 days ago
Reply to  Explore

I tend to agree. There was probably also error in judgement involved. One of the basic mountaneering rules is knowing when to turn back. If your plan is to summit in the morning and you are in bottleneck at 10 AM, you should turn back. Do not assume you will make it, if Nepalese team of 10 stronger than you and who knew their abilities (at least one of them) did it.
This or freak accident. I hope we will find out someday what happened.

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Explore
Explore
24 days ago
Reply to  Tom

Even at 10am in the Bottleneck, it depends on your capabilities. How many emergency bivouacs before at 8000+ did you have? How many times did you were at that elevation for long? What’s your current acclimatization, did you go in the last weeks to more than 8000? How many times did you sleep out in the open in -50, -60 C? etc. There were strong folks that repeatedly summited after nightfall, but again, they had reserves. However, for this specific situation, my bet is, some accident. Ali Sadpara was actually really strong and experienced. It would help to know, for… Read more »

Trish
Trish
24 days ago
Reply to  Explore

Well said! Thank you for posting that.

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Explore
Explore
24 days ago
Reply to  Craig

But yes, overall, I understand your point well. The problem is, it takes enormous discipline to become so well trained (see my answer below) to be able to plan such feats realistically. These days, most people want short-cuts. Despite the fact that climbing became so popular, actually, *fewer* people overall climb technical stuff in the Alps and other smaller ranges. More people do simple things, or all this ‘athlete’ stuff, running a bunch of hours per day, thinking it will prepare them for stuff like winter K2. Yes, in one aspect, but overall, not really. You need to get tough… Read more »

Craig
Craig
24 days ago
Reply to  Explore

Hi ‘Explore’. We are talking about two different topics here.

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Explore
Explore
24 days ago
Reply to  Craig

Hello. “K2 in winter is more dangerous.. it just is” –> yes, which is why, if you want to climb it, you should make a better assessment on how to approach the problem, what are your capabilities, compare your current state to that of other folks doing something similar systematically and successfully, then prepare and train appropriately, and don’t go before you’re around 20-25% more capable than is actually needed. And the less ‘safety margin’ you will have, the more seriously approach it. K2 in winter has probably safety margin (in case sth goes wrong) next to zero, so approach… Read more »

Rosen
Rosen
24 days ago
Reply to  Craig

If you were really adventurous, you would’ve known it’s not about ego.
A father is much more than a physical and a financial presence. I would prefer to have a father who I’ve never met but who I know was a great person, loved by everyone around him and an inspiration to everyone who met him. Instead of a father who works a job he hates from 9 to 5, a father who is an abuser, an alcoholic or one who is always absent. Probably the greatest strength a man can derive is from the achievements of his ancestors.

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Gabriela Fields
Gabriela Fields
22 days ago
Reply to  Craig

With a death rate of 25% to 30% at K2 (esp. in winter!), one should consider NOT climbing when you have sired a bunch of small children!. Period!

+2
albu
albu
24 days ago

These kids wont be the first ones raised without their fathers, happens all the time. The difference is that these kids will have a role model, their fathers were legends, true athletes! Simply by their presence there in this conditions they will be remembered as pioneers (not to mention that no supplementary O or Sherpas was used)
Was is worth it? Who are we to make this judgment?! Please have a look at video of Tamara from 17th of January, no other words needed!

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Dave
Dave
24 days ago

I have never been less impressed in my life.

Died climbing K2 in winter and left behind heartbroken kids and a wife. What an idiot.

Tragic.

+1
Taimur Khan
Taimur Khan
24 days ago

Whats going on here guys. Some of u r getting very personal…who r u to label my take or anyones take on the scenario as dumb? Who r u to belittle someone’s desire to battle with the elements in the most primordial way? Ok so u chose not to do so! Bully for u! I dont see the climber / adventurer community on your ass belittling your life choices. Obviously they cared for their families far more than u possibly could so there is no point in being holier than thou here. Besides, this is an adventure site. Get off… Read more »

Rod Routen
Rod Routen
24 days ago
Reply to  Taimur Khan

Agree Taimur. Too many judgemental comments for my liking.
What is the phrase ‘ rather live one day as a lion etc.’
I respect and revere their courage and fortitude. I still hope for them.

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Fifty
Fifty
24 days ago
Reply to  Taimur Khan

I 100% agree with you Taimur. These people are pathetic, they can only fight with their fingers behind a screen and will certainly never be in a position to make such large decisions like these brave men we just lost.
Nobody would have been talking about this angle would they have summited and came home in one piece. This is just the right narrarative to jump on at the moment, these people are just riding the righteousness bandwagon. It’s a cancer in modern society.

To those people: Learn to show some respect.

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K2 mountaineers fan
24 days ago
Reply to  Taimur Khan

Agree with Taimur. Death is imminent. It has to come one day at its time and place. No one spared. If risk matters in this sense then who will become soldier, pilot, diver etc

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Tina
Tina
19 hours ago
Reply to  Taimur Khan

Obviously they didn’t care enough about their families or they would have given climbing places like k2 and being away from home for months at a time up. #selfish

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Daniel
Daniel
24 days ago

They didn’t risk their own lives. They risked their children’s lives and futures. That’s pretty shitty

+1
Taimur Khan
Taimur Khan
24 days ago
Reply to  Daniel

How do u know Daniel? U their lawyer or insurance agent? What do u know about any of them. Ali has one son who was on the mountain with him. He is so poor his wish is to buy a sewing machine for his wife. This is his job. Not zure but its possible John was supporting his 6 kids through the commercial applications of his hobby. Why r u guys following mountaineering and mountaineers if all u want to do is to disparage their memories and belittle their achievements and lifelong passion. There are plenty of drug addicts general… Read more »

Taimur Khan
Taimur Khan
24 days ago
Reply to  Taimur Khan

The gentleman who goes by explore made the most intelligent informed and pertinent comments. Who prepared u were defines whether the climb was ill advised or not. If u were prepared and strong as I believe Ali was, it should be ok to try these inspiring achievements suxh as k2 in winter. Not sure about the others but john had.climbed k2 before and other 8000ers also probably without oxygen which makes him a strong candidate. I think they acclimatized also though the last night may have been too crowded and hurt their preparations for the summit.

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Paddy Schofield
Paddy Schofield
24 days ago
Reply to  Taimur Khan

Sad news. To a certain extent with huge mountains. It is the luck of the draw. Anyone who has been ice climbing or winter mountaineering will understand. Objective danger is something which is out of our control. Crevasse. Bergshrund. Bits of ice or rock falling down on you, Seracs, avalanche. Wrong place wrong time. Thats it, regardless of experience. Geological time includes now. Peace

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Daniel
Daniel
24 days ago
Reply to  Taimur Khan

I know because this article tells me. They had children. They attempted K2 in winter. That’s how I know.

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Taimur
Taimur
24 days ago

Imagine sitting your children down to tell them Daddy isn’t coming home because he chose to go and climb a hill… What a tragic waste.

+1
Taimur Khan
Taimur Khan
22 days ago
Reply to  Taimur

My dear Taimur and all the others criticising the missing climbers for their life choices I too am called Taimur though thankfully i have attached the sobriquet khan here so i will mercifully not be confused with u! When my time comes my wife will probably tell them daddy chose to smoke cigarettes! Someone else decides to drive fast and stops a truck on the way…a third forgets to wear a mask….the list is endless. The only difference is nobody knows the others so nobody gives them any shit, while these poor sods happen to be in the full ugly… Read more »

epic
epic
21 days ago
Reply to  Taimur

a hill? a HILL? shut up and get a LIFE. yu call K2 a HILL? thats rude to those who actually summited it.

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K2 mountaineers fan
23 days ago

Mountaineering is not a common sport. Its only for brave hearts. Its a passion. If you are more curious then dnt waste your time to visit this site. Simply go & take rest in bed.

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K2 mountaineers fan
23 days ago

Salute to these brave hearts.
Ali Sadpara once said, ‘if I ever get stuck in the mountains, I will take shelter in the ice but I will never imagine to give up.

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Paddy Schofield
Paddy Schofield
23 days ago

Yes but you don’t always get the choice to do the right thing….you can just be wiped out regardless.peace

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Even
Even
23 days ago

I’m shocked by all these hatefull comments. I wouldn’t be too surprised by such comments in the newspapers, but here on explorersweb. Families have lost their beloved husband and father, and people are judging them on the internet. Cmon! Show some respect for the climbers and their families. The families left behind do not deserve to read this crap. I fully understand their desire for Mountaineering and big achievements. It is a big part og their identity, it is probably a very important part of them, and I can imagine that they wouldn’t be truely happy without. Having a kid… Read more »

epic
epic
21 days ago
Reply to  Even

well said

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Deborah A Boone
Deborah A Boone
23 days ago

I send my condolences to these missing climbers’ families. It is so sad. I’m not a climber but I am interested in it..,my time for adventure is gone and I understand the rush…

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Brenda Erickson
Brenda Erickson
23 days ago

My prayers go out to these men and their families. I pray Jesus holds them in the palm of his hand keeping them warm and safe till they are found.The power of prayer is mighty. Keep the faith and prayers going.

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Gabriela Fields
Gabriela Fields
22 days ago

Be careful of what you say–not every climber is a Christian who wants to be “in the arms of Jesus”. We should not be so arrogant to think that Jesus is it! One of the 3 climbers is a Muslim, so we should not try to push our beliefs on him. His religious belief is just as legitimate to him, as yours is to you.

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K2 mountaineers fan
22 days ago

Agreed @G Field, But one thing to know we the muslims respect jesus as he is messenger of God and believe in return back of him in the world again.

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Rizwan
Rizwan
23 days ago

I love u all, especially sadpara for his unending love to iced peaks and relentless endeavour to surpass them. I love u all

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epic
epic
23 days ago

those who are saying that the climbers werent experienced enough and that they are selfish, get a life. skatov summited everest 2 times. and he just liked climbing.its not even his fault he fell. its the rope fault.

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Barbara
Barbara
23 days ago

There’s the fact that surving k2 is 1:4 or 1:5. all of the climber’s families did know that. all the wifes and mother loved their husbands and fathers well knowing what their desire, love and mountaineering identity was! there is no either or: either being climber o r beimg father. it’s since a century been both.
everyone who believes to have the only right perspective should consider that and step down from their narcissistic moral throne. it’s disgusting as always after expeditions gone wrong with high losses.

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Explore
Explore
23 days ago
Reply to  Barbara

Yes, but one important remark that confuses this matter so much – it is NOT true that “surving k2 is 1:4 or 1:5”. This is a completely nonsense ratio, which is “the number of climbers who summit / the number of dead climbers”. But, the chance of success is actually pretty low! There is *much more* people trying K2 than there is the number of people who reach the top. I don’t understand why this confusing ratio is always used. To make it precise, one would have to use “the number of all climbers who try to climb K2 (including… Read more »

barbara
barbara
22 days ago
Reply to  Explore

but for the question of family vs expedition climbing it matters. no one should suppose that these climbers didn’t know the risk(s). well prepared as they were they knew the accidents and the number of deads – they knew the force of death andpossible deadly circumstances. and their wifes, too.
and no one can deal with the loss of a beloved one previously. but they are beloved ones. and judging against their climbing is pathetic and will ever be.

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Gabriela Fields
Gabriela Fields
22 days ago

John Sorri’s 2 youngest kids are toddlers—oh well, they will never know their daddy. How sad. I am assuming JP Mohr’s children are small too, given his age of 33. I personally think it is very selfish to pursue high-risk climbing while having small children to take care of. You can’t have both—but that is just my opinion, everyone has to make their own choices.

+2
Eddy De Wilde
Eddy De Wilde
22 days ago

Good work Ash. Have you ever had this many responses?

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Gary
Gary
20 days ago

K2 in the winter a deadly combination leading to these tragic events, heartfelt condolences to all of the climbers friends and family.

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Gary
Gary
20 days ago

I just read most of the comments and find that it’s not up to me to judge after this tragic event has happened, Iam sure there families have expressed how they feel about there father’s climbing many times.They need support now more than ever.

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