Winter K2 Wraps Up With Many Unanswered Questions

K2 Winter 8000ers
The summit of K2 in evening light. Photo: Jon Kedrowski

The recent winter expedition to K2 writes a new chapter in mountaineering history. Finally, a climbing team stepped on its summit in the dead of winter. But that was not the only first achieved. We witnessed unprecedented numbers of people on the mountain, many of whom had not even previously considered tackling this ultimate challenge. For some, it was a commercial opportunity. Others pursued a summit strategy which culminated in three teams merging into one on behalf of national achievement. Their summit push was flawless and 100% successful. But the season also featured a disastrous second bid, which ended with several people injured, others traumatized by the experience, and worst of all, four lives lost to the mountain.

From my point of view as a journalist, the expedition was not easy to cover. From the first, some participants rationed the information that they were willing to share, avoided direct questions, and referred only to their social media, where posts had more to do with PR and selfies than with simple, factual accounts of the events as they unfolded.

Mingma David Sherpa deals with a steep section.

From the glorious summit day on January 16 and the incomplete details that followed to the nightmarish hours following the night of February 4, we all wanted to know what was going on up there. Even now, we continue to have as many questions as answers.

A well-deserved summit — but why no details?

The lack of information or pictures produced not only anticipation but also some suspicion, warranted or not. It had never happened before that a climber waited 48 hours after returning to Base Camp to make the grand “reveal” that he had used no oxygen. Nirmal Purja’s summit video and official statement on social media, only released four days afterward, declared, “Brother to brother, shoulder to shoulder, we walked together to the summit whilst singing the Nepali national anthem.” It included a message of unity about making the impossible possible and ended with a warning about climate change. But there were no actual climbing details.

Nirmal Purja and Mingma G celebrate back in Nepal. Photo: Nepali Times

The discussion about style figures in all significant activities in the high mountains, but everyone, regardless of their style preferences, hailed the achievement. New summit videos, like this one by Mingma G’s group, continue to appear.

Mingma Tenzi Sherpa holds Nepal’s flag on the summit of K2 at sunset. Photo: MT Sherpa

Unfortunately, the death of Sergi Mingote threw a shadow on that otherwise great day. Mingote had just completed an acclimatization round to Camp 3 and fell to his death on his way back to Base Camp.

Climbers too eager for a new summit chance?

After returning from the summit, all the participants left Base Camp (except for Sona Sherpa, perhaps continuing to work for SST). The remaining climbers patiently sat out a long spell of bad weather. In particular, John Snorri and the Sadparas surely regretted the missed opportunity. They had been the first to reach Base Camp, and had seen a large, well-coordinated team hurry past them to the top.

By the beginning of February, a new window opened, but just a slit. If there were to be a summit, it would have to be fast. No one was sure about conditions on the route, especially the ropes, after days of violent wind. But the climbers were understandably tired of hanging around the cold Base Camp, dealing with stomach bugs, and fighting those inner voices telling them to run for their lives. So they all jumped at this last, now-or-never chance.

Juan Pablo Mohr. Photo: Oswald Rodrigo Pereira

“Today, a team of eight Sherpas went up from Base Camp,” SST leader Chhang Dawa Sherpa reported on February 1. “The team will recheck all the equipment left in higher camps, repair the fixed rope, and deposit oxygen bottles as well; many parts of the route might have been damaged from the [two weeks of] harsh weather.”

The summit strategy depended on each climber’s pace. Many progressed one camp a day. Others delayed their departure and hurried upward, skipping one camp. All were to gather in Camp 3 on February 4 for a last short rest before heading for the summit on February 5. Everyone had to be back down by the afternoon of February 6, when winds were expected to pick up violently.

Elia Saikaly at work in Base Camp. Photo from Saikaly’s IG

What Happened at Camp 3?

The going from Camp 2 was tough. As Colin O’Brady reported, some ropes were buried in snow, which forced climbers to proceed unroped for a while. As the team members reached “higher” Camp 3 at 7,300m, some of them after nightfall, they discovered to their dismay that there were no tents. “We had been told that there were three [buried?] tents and stakes, and we needed to find them, but we never found a tent,” said Antonio Sykaris.

The only confirmed tents at Camp 3 that night were those carried by three climbers: Sajid Sadpara (to share with his father and john Snorri), Tamara Lunger (with JP Mohr), and Colin O’Brady, who was among the first to get there. A video by Noel Hanna also shows a fourth tent, but there were over 20 climbers around C3 at the time.

With temperatures dropping to -40ºC and some climbers already suffering from frostbite, everyone crammed into two- or three-person tents, unable to lie down, melt water, or rest. Reports indicated seven or eight people in each tent.

It is not known where the other tents were, or how the lead Sherpa team tried to deal with the issue. Elia Saikaly, who has supposed to follow and film Snorri’s team as high as possible, said that the oxygen he had purchased was not where it was supposed to be, forcing him and Pasang Kanji Sherpa to stop at lower Camp 3, thus “saving our lives,” Saikaly believes.

In the early morning of February 5, John Snorri, Muhammad Ali Sadpara, Sajid Sadpara, and Juan Pablo Mohr headed up toward the summit. Some other climbers apparently followed them for a while, but turned around before 8,000m, at a large crevasse disrupting the way to the Bottleneck. Precisely at that spot (at about 8,200m) at 10 am, Sajid Sadpara’s oxygen system malfunctioned. Apparently, on the advice of his father, he decided to retreat and wait for the others at Camp 3. But they never returned.

Antonios Sykaris, exhausted and frostbitten, arrives back in Base Camp. Photo: Antonios Sykaris

How did Atanas Skatov fall?

Meanwhile, for whatever reason, the rest of the SST climbers called off their attempt began to head back down to Base Camp. Atanas Skatov of Bulgaria walked down at a good pace and without the help of an ice ax, behind his companion, Lakpa Dendi Sherpa. According to Sykaris, Dendi Sherpa and Elia Saikaly were just below Skatov and Lakpa. While down-climbing or rappeling a steep section, Skatov fell. Dendi Sherpa was filming the scenery at the time. When he turned to film Skatov, he was not there anymore.

“All of a sudden, in the blink of an eye, he fell down and disappeared,” Lakpa Dendi recalled, in shock. Skatov flew past Saikaly during his fall and did not stop until nearly Advanced Base Camp.

At the time, the first explanation was that a rope had snapped. Sykaris suggested that the ropes were buried at that section. Lakpa Dendi says he saw Skatov clipping his carabiners from one rope to another, but he didn’t see how Skatov fell.

Dawa Sherpa later said that Skatov made a mistake while changing from one safety rope to the next. Elia Saikaly recalls that the tangle of old ropes on much of the route made it sometimes hard to tell which was the right one to use. In the end, no one saw exactly how Skatov lost his footing, but the fact is that he fell to his death on a supposedly fixed route to Base Camp, where his fiancee waited.

John Snorri, Ali Sadpara, and Atanas Skatov.

What happened to the three missing climbers?

As the hours and then days passed without news from John Snorri, Ali Sadpara, and Juan Pablo Mohr, the internet filled with rumors, fake news, and several accounts impersonating the climbers, in particular Muhammad Ali Sadpara. Sadpara was probably the best climber on the mountain but also a genuinely kind man who had made friends on every expedition he had taken part in.

Pakistani authorities and relatives of the three climbers carried out an unprecedented search, tracking their GPS and satellite devices and surveying the route from helicopters, even in bad weather and above the helicopters’ service ceiling of 7,800m. Planes equipped with infrared cameras filmed the mountain; the high-resolution satellite and radar images were combed over, without finding any signs.

Moreover, four climbers from Sadpara’s village did not hesitate to risk their lives on ground searches from Base Camp. All efforts have proved fruitless. The search may continue in the future, but hopes of finding them alive have faded.

Conclusion: It’s not over

While K2 is finally deserted, the significance of this recent season will echo for some time. At ExplorersWeb, we will do our best to gather further information from those involved in the climb, in order to fill gaps. At the same time, it is clear that certain details will remain unknown.

Everyone engaged in this expedition was an experienced climber. Many of them were mountain professionals. The 10 summiters, in particular, achieved a great goal that should lead to new opportunities for them. It is only normal that audiences are keen to know more about the experience and to ask for details. Their climb will also be subject to public commentary, as with all the best mountaineers in history, from Messner to Urubko, or from Tenzing Norgay to Nirmal Purja. They deserve no less: Not scrutinizing the details of their climb in the same way that we scrutinize everyone else’s, because of some misguided delicacy over nationality, would be patronizing, disrespectful, and unfair.

He said he would made it, and he did: Mingma G on the summit of K2 in winter. Photo: Mingma G

In the field of expedition logistics, the Himalayan winter may have changed forever. Seven Summit Treks has shown that a fully serviced expedition on the wildest peak at the worst time of year is possible, so the market is open for future endeavors, for those willing to take the risk.

As for the first winter summit on K2, that page has been boldly written by (in alphabetical order): Dawa Temba Sherpa, Dawa Tenjin Sherpa, Kilu Pemba Sherpa, Geljen Sherpa, Mingma “David” Gyabu Sherpa, Mingma “G” Gyalje Sherpa, Mingma Tenzi Sherpa, Nirmal Purja (without O2!), Pem Chiri Sherpa, and Sona Sherpa. The Nepali team has shown how to climb K2. Many other challenges remain in the high mountains, and no doubt some of these 10 will be taking part in them.

As for the missing climbers, and the two who lost their lives in accidents, the loss is irreparable. All had other projects to complete, families to care for, and many years ahead of them. In the case of Muhammad Ali Sadpara, a small silver lining comes because local politicians are now willing to support Ali’s dream to improve education for the children of Sadpara village. Hopefully, they might even start a climbing school to increase professional opportunities for the people of Gilgit-Baltistan. Then in time, as the Sherpas have done, they can take a major role in both the climbing community and the mountain tourism industry.

Ali Sadpara’s last portrait, taken by Elia Saikaly. His son, Sajid, said of him: “My father is like a Snow Leopard. He moves incredibly fast in the mountains.”

+10

About the Author

Angela Benavides

Angela Benavides

Senior journalist, published author and communication consultant. Specialized on high-altitude mountaineering, with an interest for everything around the mountains: from economics to geopolitics. After five years exploring distant professional ranges, I returned to ExWeb BC in 2018. Feeling right at home since then!

Subscribe
Notify of
guest
72 Comments
Oldest
Newest Most Voted
Inline Feedbacks
View all comments
Climb From Home Mountaineer
Climb From Home Mountaineer
1 month ago

Angela – Myself and I’m sure the rest of the climbing community are incredibly grateful for your incredible coverage over the course of what has been a bittersweet winter K2 season. Thank you once again for all your work.

+28
MuddyBoots
MuddyBoots
1 month ago

Thank you for your insightful coverage, Angela and Explorersweb. I do wonder what should be learned from the large SST commercial expedition experience this year. I don’t think one can say this season has shown that delivering a fully serviced expedition to K2 is possible, only that it is marketable. The biggest questions are around the debacle at Camp 3, and the management of that crisis. SST reported: “Today, a team of eight Sherpas went up from Base Camp,” SST leader Chhang Dawa Sherpa reported on February 1. “The team will recheck all the equipment left in higher camps, repair… Read more »

Samson Simon Sharaf
1 month ago
Reply to  MuddyBoots

Agree

+7
Debbie
Debbie
1 month ago
Reply to  MuddyBoots

Yes, you are right, if the company did not openly warn the climbers of the situation at Camp 3 this is a “huge breach of trust”. It is important to hear some credible answers to this issue. If climbers knew aboth this they would have acted differently andy some of them would have abandoned the idea to try for the summit all together.

+5
Dr MCS
Dr MCS
1 month ago
Reply to  MuddyBoots

Agree with you…Truth has to come out for the benefit of future expeditions…

0
Kiper
Kiper
1 month ago

Thank you for your fantastic job. You made the explorersweb a go-to website!!! Thank you!

+7
Farukh Ali
Farukh Ali
1 month ago

Thank you for timely updates and special mention of all-night reporting on 16th January and 5th February. Your writing is engaging and clear. 

I’m sorry about the challenges that you had face against misinformation about the summit team to dealing with angry comments.

Thank you, Angela.

+9
Marcio Pinheiro
Marcio Pinheiro
1 month ago

Thank you Angela! You did a brilliant job, with a natural language you provided information even to those who are not mountaineering experts. Really appreciate!

+6
Last edited 1 month ago by Marcio Pinheiro
dgn
dgn
1 month ago

Thank you, indeed! The coverage on this website has been excellent.

One note: The image of the three climbers right above the “What happened to the three missing climbers?” heading is captioned “John Snorri, Ali Sadpara, and Juan Pablo Mohr.” However, the third climber is Atanas Skatov, not Juan Pablo Mohr.

+5
Jerry Kobalenko
Admin
1 month ago
Reply to  dgn

Corrected, thank you.

0
Stan
Stan
1 month ago

I’d like to say thank you I have been following the K2 climb for the past couple months it’s sad we had to lose lives for such a great adventure but the 10 who made it my congrats and for you for writing such a wonderful piece for me to follow I’m just a person who enjoys a good article good Adventure I’m not a climber but thank you my condolences to the families of the climbers who did not return

+3
Paul
Paul
1 month ago

Nims published his summit photo day after coming to BC (the arrived at evening), two photos without oxygen mask shows clearly that he did it without O2, next day he just wrote about it so he didn’t wait 48h. Only Mingma G was waiting long to confirm if he was without O2 as he planned or with O2. Is there anything unanswered about the summit push? And I agree, it was hard to find out what is going on at K2 this winter, 4 teams, with lots of individual climbers in one of it created lots of mess, unfortunately not… Read more »

Jodie
Jodie
1 month ago

Angela thank you very much for your coverage of events that have unfolded on K2 mountain this year. I think we all who have followed this really appreciate it. I love that you are not afraid to ask the tough questions and really hope that the community as a whole can get more answers as to what exactly transpired in the days leading up to the terrible tragedies on K2. There are far too many “coincidences” in my humble opinion and I think the families deserve answers regarding missing tents, conflicting and downright alarming reports about the ropes, missing tents… Read more »

Lry
Lry
1 month ago

That testimony about the crevasse made my stomach flutter in the worst way, but I’m not sure we will ever know what happened.

Thank you for your diligent and respectful reporting, even when details were sparse. May life be kind to the families who lost their loved one.

+3
Last edited 1 month ago by Lry
MuddyBoots
MuddyBoots
1 month ago
Reply to  Lry

That crevasse between camps 3 and 4 raises more questions too. The Nepali team mentioned that when they encountered this large crevasse they had to backtrack almost to camp 3 and improvise a new route. Did Sadpara & his team follow the improvised route about camp 3 ? Did they even know about it? Or after leaving Sajid did they proceed on the normal route and then encounter the uncrossable crevasse? Backtracking or searching for an alternate route, in colder temps and without O2 would have been unimaginably difficult.

+6
Farukh Ali
Farukh Ali
1 month ago
Reply to  MuddyBoots

They were at 8200m altitude when Sajid split and it’s right where the bottleneck is. C4 is at around 8000m. They had already crossed the area between C3 and C4 and were nearing the summit.

They didn’t backtrack or searched alternate route as far as Sajid’s interview is concerned. They were in good condition and were right on track.

+5
MuddyBoots
MuddyBoots
1 month ago
Reply to  Farukh Ali

To me that is part of the mystery and raises more questions. The Nepali team made a BIG deal about an impassable crevasse and an alternate route. But Sajid hasn’t said anything specific yet about the crevasse or the route. So either (1) the new route was roped and marked, and remained visible after weeks of snow and bad weather (thus showing that the story about the first team removing ropes was a lie) or (2) the Sadpara team also made a new route, but Sajid has not yet mentioned a reportedly impassable crevasse, which seems like a big thing… Read more »

Helen
Helen
1 month ago
Reply to  MuddyBoots

I was listening to the Youtube (at 12:20min) from Moriah and here she talks about Ali, John, Sajid and JP, jumping over the cravasse: “when they arrived to the crevasse… situated between C3 and C4, the other people (climbers) that were there with them decided to go back…. but they continue and jump over the crevasse” Link: K2 winter 2021- Timeline of a Tragedy The Nepalese Team, question about the crevasse:  Mingma G: “Until Camp-3, it is very easy. Then on our way to Camp-4, at first, we tried following the summer route. But 30m below Camp-4, we found a… Read more »

Last edited 1 month ago by Helen
Bill Bones
1 month ago
Reply to  MuddyBoots

I agree, I believe they were probably swallowed up by the creavase, I highly doubt their remains will ever be found

+1
Stephen Frank
Stephen Frank
1 month ago

They wanted to post to their social media vs give a reporter the details. In a sense their social media where they wanted people to go for news. I kind of understand their thinking.

+5
F v
F v
1 month ago

Sandro is editing a movie of the 10 Nepalese, that’s maybe a reason of the low information / pictures. I found another interview with Mingma G where he told this: “around the Bottleneck on the traverse-path in the morning, at around 9 am. Our rope-fixing was in progress – Mingma Tenzi was leading the team. He did the fixing till the summit.” So Mingma Tenzi (in the yellow downsuit) takes the lead instead of Nims? https://www.dreamwanderlust.com/news/k2-in-winter-for-national-pride-justice-and-face-saving-inheritance-enthused-mingma-g

+2
Tenzin
Tenzin
1 month ago

The Nepali team, as far as i gather from the talks given in Nepali, took turn in fixing ropes. Yes, camp 4 to summit ropes were fixed by mingma tenzi. Nims must have done his share till camp 4. Also since he was going without O2, team must have felt it would be difficult to rely on Nims to fix ropes above 8000m. Or the team must have wanted him to succeed summit without O2 for country and made sure his endeavor was less stressful as much as possible… all assumptions, but i am sure we will get details in… Read more »

Tenzin
Tenzin
1 month ago
Reply to  F v

Nims was leading 5 others in his team. 1 from SST was following the others. Mingma G team has 3 climbers. Mingma G in his Kathmandu post interview said he and some others nearly gave up somewhere below bottleneck. He said they only continued after Nims encouraged them. So it seems Nims was leading the team as the main motivator to the whole team. That’s my understanding.

+2
Elena
Elena
1 month ago

Angela, thank you very much for the done work!
I have one question – did the summit of the Nepalese team confirm the testimony of the trekkers?

+2
Samson Simon Sharaf
1 month ago

Mountaineering is a dangerously risky extreme sport. In most formidable climbs on dangerous peaks like K2, Nanga Parbat, G1, Annapurna success is laced with high risks. K2 strikes back on descent. This was what the three Hero’s bet on. They could not beat odds. God Bless them
More later

+1
Sean
Sean
1 month ago

They were not heroes. Heroes don’t make young children fatherless.

+4
Last edited 1 month ago by Sean
MuddyBoots
MuddyBoots
1 month ago
Reply to  Sean

According to Oxford English Dictionary, a hero is “a person who is admired or idealized for courage, outstanding achievements, or noble qualities.” None of this implies the person is perfect in every way, and indeed many people widely considered to be heroic are imperfect. Climbing was a job to Ali Sadpara, as it was to many of the men in this region. It happened that he was really good at it, and he loved it. One might argue that Ali Sadpara was selfless, in that there were not many opportunities for a man with his education to provide for a… Read more »

Last edited 1 month ago by MuddyBoots
Mikael Funch
Mikael Funch
1 month ago
Reply to  Sean

Have had same thoughts for days. What kind of personality climbes K2 in winter with 6 (!) children, all minor, at home? Uli Steck had no children for a reason. Sorry to say but this sounds too selfcentered to me. R.I.P. My thoughts go the wife.

+1
mijares
jose mijares
1 month ago

Congratulations Angela!
You did a fantastic coverage. But you have “forgotten” to mention all the critics you have received day after day for honestly reporting the facts. Unfortunately many followers/fans have behaved like hooligans with you. It must have beed hard. Thank you again for your chronicles.

+3
Last edited 1 month ago by mijares
Sean
Sean
1 month ago

How was Ali Sadpara born in 1976 when he looks like he was born in 1946?

0
Nat
Nat
1 month ago
Reply to  Sean

You’re just a troll Sean. You ken the saying? If you can’t say anything nice, than don’t say anything at all.

+10
Samson Simon Sharaf
1 month ago

Angela, Many thanks. I followed you everywhere. Also thanks for putting up with my posts when Garmin was showing new live locations.

+2
Pablo C
Pablo C
1 month ago

Thanks for this great job Angela and all ExWeb Team.

0
Taimur Khan
Taimur Khan
1 month ago

Thank you Angela for the thoughtful and analytical reporting. The points you make are poignant and I hope the Pakistani authorities make a note of it while awarding permits next time round. K2 is clearly not a mountain that can be crowded and sending people up ill equipped and unprepared is tantamount to murder. Obviously Ali, Joun and JP who were well equipped and organised were compromised by the shoddy work done by the commercial team as they had to share their tents and sacrifice their rest and possibly their lives in the name of humanity. Ultimately its an extreme… Read more »

Rida
Rida
1 month ago

Is there any possibility that the 3 missing climbers were blown away from the mountain by the high winds, which is why they seem to be completely untraceable on the actual mountain itself?

+1
Don Paul
Don Paul
1 month ago
Reply to  Rida

Either that, or buried in avalanche/icefall.

+2
Nat
Nat
1 month ago
Reply to  Don Paul

They couldn’t find any sign of an avalanche/icefall.

+2
Tenzin
Tenzin
1 month ago

There are many details in Nepali language given by the Nepali climbers after arriving back home. I too wish details shared for wider audience. They made a wonderful history. I am details are more interesting… but besides Nims and Mingma G, I think most of other climbers choose to talk less. Sherpas are usually shy.

+3
Saran
Saran
1 month ago

Thanks for the updates. However, one cant help but notice your disapproval towards the Sherpa team and Nims in particular not only on this post but from the very beginning of your K2 updates. The words like “selfies and PR” clearly shows your disapproval towards the Nepalese team. You even pre clarified by writing “because of some misguided delicacy over nationality”. For us who followed the expedition, we were happy with their post on social media, direct information rather than second hand version from journalists which are sometimes distorted. They have more followers than most blogs and pages, so it… Read more »

Last edited 1 month ago by Saran
Margaret Rose Oliver
Margaret Rose Oliver
1 month ago
Reply to  Saran

Excellent Saran – a very well balanced response.. Totally agree with every comment you have made.

+3
Zulema
1 month ago
Reply to  Saran

Very well said!!!

+1
Jacobo F
Jacobo F
1 month ago
Reply to  Saran

That is exactly what i was thinking, thank your for put it in words, i was hopping i wasnt the only one!!

+1
Don Paul
Don Paul
1 month ago

It sounds like Atanas Skatov clipped into some old tat at the anchor that broke. Nylon degrades with UV light and some of it might have been there for 30 years. The next capable team should remove every scrap of old webbing and rope from the route, leaving only the metal hardware. This still doesn’t explain not having an ice axe, or why his personal climbing guide wasn’t tied to him. The missing tents and O2 deliveries were for people who were not self sufficient and didn’t belong there, and did more than just create abstract risks for others. I… Read more »

Last edited 1 month ago by Don Paul
MuddyBoots
MuddyBoots
1 month ago
Reply to  Don Paul

The old ropes are still there for exactly the same reason that the accusation that Nepali team removed ropes is obviously false and ridiculous : it’s hard enough to get down from K2 safely without adding the extra work of removing old ropes.

+3
Don Paul
Don Paul
1 month ago
Reply to  MuddyBoots

It’s not hard, it’s that nobody gives a sh-t. They don’t have to be removed in the winter in high winds. There just has to be a party of real climbers on it. Look at what Hayden Kennedy and Jason Kruk did on the Compressor. A parade of gumbys isn’t what K2 needs.

+2
Last edited 1 month ago by Don Paul
chris
chris
1 month ago
Reply to  Don Paul

K2 is not comparable to Cerro Torre in terms of altitude and physical exertion. Its just not comparable- the bolts Kruk/Kennedy removed were not that heavy or bulky
Hundreds of feet of ropes weighs a ton and removing them from the mtn would be near impossible.

+3
Jim M
Jim M
1 month ago
Reply to  chris

Climbed it have you ?

0
chris
chris
1 month ago
Reply to  Jim M

Nope.. But if you feel the two mtns are in any way comparable you have no clue about the basics of climbing, altitude and rope work..
Cerro Torre is at 10,262 ft. K2 is at 28,251….
Cant say I have ever heard of a bolt being clipped on K2… Nor have I heard of anyone going up “fixed lines” on cerro torre…
Cheers

+2
Last edited 1 month ago by chris
Olga Mallo
Olga Mallo
1 month ago

5 dead climbers , not 4

+1
Don Paul
Don Paul
1 month ago
Reply to  Olga Mallo

She mentions Sergi Mingote later in the article. The part you refer to is about the second group trying to summit, and Atanas Skatov is included in that.

0
Last edited 1 month ago by Don Paul
Uttam
Uttam
1 month ago

Thanks Angela for a nice wrap up. My final thoughts on the questions/issues raised by the 2021 K2 Winter: [1] The tents fiasco on Camp 3  Not only did SST unwittingly put its own staff and clients at risk by sending them to Camp 3 without first ascertaining the status of their tents there (or sending extra tents along with them, just in case) but left the climbers already tented there with a moral dilemma – share their tents and they won’t even get a wink of much-needed sleep; don’t share the tents and those unfortunate souls might catch hypothermia,… Read more »

F v
F v
1 month ago
Reply to  Uttam

[1] i hope SST comes with a report what happened that night, and why the preparation and checking failed, sended already 8 up on monday. This looks bad for them. On the 15th SST(Lakpa8844) brougt load ferry incl 5 ox bottles from BC to high C3, for summit push. Why not on feb 4? [4] if you read this quote from JS: “All I know is there are line missing on the way. Nims used my 700m lines to fix Bottleneck and the traverse.” https://www.alanarnette.com/blog/2021/02/01/winter-k2-update-threading-the-needle/ than it’s a bit silly to remove the ropes after useage. I still believe they… Read more »

Uttam
Uttam
1 month ago
Reply to  F v

[1] Right, SST needs to hire a PR/communications person and go into a damage control mode. Their silence is quite deafening. It is absurd to blame SST for everything that followed the post-Camp 3 Tents fiasco and is not justified. As the saying goes, “there is many a slip between the cup and the lip”. [4] Mingma G and Nims’ team fixed the line in the upper sections of K2. Very clever of John Snorri to give Nims his 700m lines to fix Bottleneck and the traverse back in January. Even with Nim’s and Mingma G’s team quite literally doing… Read more »

F v
F v
1 month ago

Small detail, the mountain on the picture with the moonrise from Arnold Coster is Broad Peak 😉

0
MA Hussain.
1 month ago

Nice coverage of the expedition. Pakistan is a paradise for the climbers & trekkers. Most of the trekking routes lies in the northern mountains of Hindukush, Karakoram & Himaliya. The team was on the restricted zone of trekking, from where most probably they obtained a trekking permit, hired a licensed mountain guide & buy a personal accident insurance policy for the guide & the porters. It is also necessary to attend a mandatory briefing & de-briefing at the Ministry of Tourism, on the beginning & end of the trekking trip. I am not a professional climber, but having deep interest… Read more »

so sad
so sad
1 month ago

I hope the questions raised get answered… thank you Angela

+1
Last edited 1 month ago by so sad
Bulgarian seaman
Bulgarian seaman
1 month ago

Thank you ! We can see the truth is underway. Finally the people start asking right questions here in the comments, so many accept negligence theory . In each tragedy at least at sea there have three initial steps: 1.SOF- Statement of facts. 2.Route Cause analysis 3.Risk assessment reviewing( if any important checkpoint is ommited in the list of many checks before the event starts in order to be corrected for future use)- which has to be done before the event . The Sea companies can not afford to lost the vessel for 220 million $ due to human errors,… Read more »

harold
harold
1 month ago

thankyou for the touching words and rightful respect you gave to ali sadpara
may all the climbers lost on k2 rest in peace

0
Badar
Badar
1 month ago
Reply to  harold

Just listen to nazir sabir , what is saying about this expedition

0
Boz Šahin
Boz Šahin
1 month ago

To the moderators. Why did you delete my reply to Sean? Its obviously that he is insulting those climbers who lost their lives on K2. He said bad words about Ali Sadpara, John Snorri etc

+1
Last edited 1 month ago by Boz Šahin
Jerry Kobalenko
Admin
1 month ago
Reply to  Boz Šahin

Insults among commenters are deleted. We welcome civil disagreements, discussions, opinions, etc. but once disagreement devolves to name-calling, it’s gone.

+1
Mikael Funch
Mikael Funch
1 month ago

Thanks for this fantastic article, giving more insight on this tragic and crazy event with so many unanswered questions. Sounds to me (without any knowledge on K2 at all) that competition, focus on goal and honour at all cost, was putting rational thinking aside. So few of the big “First Ever” are left to an increasingly larger group of professional explorers willing to risk everything (pushed by will and sponsors etc.). We will se more of this in the near future. Boundaries are pushed over the limit.

0
Last edited 1 month ago by Mikael Funch
Darlene R. Nice
Darlene R. Nice
1 month ago

I am not a Everest climber…but at 67 years of age, have had a deep interest and love for the Summit…it has fascinated me for many years.
I have a strange request. I would like to carefully plan a small, biodegradable, package of my bodily ashes, upon my death, date unknown, to be carried in a pocket of, preferably a Sherpa, to the Summit. My heir will send my (tablespoon) ashes to Nepal after my death. I will include a contribution at that time.
Am unsure how and where to begin.
Would someone please advise.

0
Nasko
Nasko
1 month ago

Hi Angela, thanks for the report first! I would like you to share where did you get the info that Atanas was down climbing from c3 without ice axe? If you know more details than in the report ..
Regards, Nasko

+1
antonio
antonio
1 month ago

Himalaya !where does it start and finishes?K2 is in the Karakoram right?i’ve read that it stops at the Hindus river.

0
Marcelo Espejo
Marcelo Espejo
1 month ago

Muy bueno Angela

0
Anna
1 month ago

I can not understand what happened to the experience climbers. And the tents and the oxygen??? The people that went up before them did they take it??? Something not right here.

0
Kamen Dimitrov
Kamen Dimitrov
1 month ago

Thanks for the news. I cant stop thinking about Atanas Skatov. Poor man died at Horrible circumstances. May they rest in peace 🙏 all of them who lost their lives.

0
Bill Bones
1 month ago

My guess is the missing climbers were lost in the creavase, due to the nature of a high altitude creavase it’s doubtful their remains will ever be found
RIP

0