Everest: A Crowded Sunday Ahead?

8000ers Everest
Climbers head for the summit of Everest. Photo: Tommy Ceppi

Uncertain weather and recent heavy snowfall make for a nail-biting end to the Everest season. It’s now or never, as 300 climbers converge on the summit.

The prospect of worsening weather next week, followed by the closure of the route on May 28, has triggered a massive push. Leader Chhang Dawa Sherpa estimates that 300 climbers are currently heading for the summit. The regulations from Nepal forcing expeditions to summit in the order of their permits seem to have fallen by the wayside.

It seems that the only way to avoid crowds is if good weather persists for days. But now, everyone either has to summit in a mad dash or give up their Everest dreams for this season. Sunday should see a massive number of climbers on Everest’s upper slopes. We may not see pictures of crowds, but there will be crowds.

Thrashing through fresh snow, with possibly buried ropes, will tax all the climbers. Many of them have been in Camp 2 or even Camp 3 for days.

A crowded Camp 3

An unknown number of Seven Summit Treks clients were in Base Camp, hoping for a chance next week. However, as the weather cleared, some of the strongest individuals launched a 24-hour summit sprint.

“Our Everest and Lhotse summit teams are either hunkered down at C3 or ascending the Lhotse Face toward C3 as we write,” Climbing The Seven Summits posted at around 6 pm Nepal time. “The weather has cleared and the team is reporting sunny skies and low winds on the Face.”

Most climbers are now in Camp 3, including those who had been biding their time in Camp 2. Others have sped all the way to C3 from Base Camp. SummitClimb’s Dan Mazur estimates that they made the trip in nice weather in about six hours.

“Some of us were climbing on oxygen,” he admitted. Not too many years ago, climbers turned on the oxygen at the South Col, but the use of bottled gas (and the flow rate) has increased significantly.

Madison Mountaineering planned to reach Camp 4 today and begin their summit move tonight.

Still sketchy above the South Col

Above the South Col, however, conditions remain sketchy. “The wind is becoming acceptable but [is still] around 35kph,” writes Pascal de Noel of France. “Combined with the fog and snow from the Bengal cyclone over several days, the summit now appears very uncertain.”

De Noel adds that if the snow is heavy, they may have to turn back because of the avalanche risk between Camps 4 and 3 during the daytime descent. Currently, he concludes, “only the strongest will reach the top.”

Little word has come from the no-O2 climbers. Only Sanna Raistakka and Roland van Oss said yesterday that they were about to set off. They were counting on the summit pushes stretching over three days to avoid getting stuck in a traffic jam. But given the narrowing window and the mass of bodies converging on the summit, they may not have that luxury.

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About the Author

Angela Benavides

Angela Benavides

Senior journalist, published author and communication consultant. Specialized on high-altitude mountaineering, with an interest for everything around the mountains: from economics to geopolitics. After five years exploring distant professional ranges, I returned to ExWeb BC in 2018. Feeling right at home since then!

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Everest
Everest
2 months ago

First it was Covid ravaging the teams but yet they’re still climbing. I’m so glad I don’t live in India & have covid & need oxygen because it’s being wasted by narcissists climbing a mountain. All these mountain groups should have paid the sherpas & cancelled the season. We all know it’s the sherpas who do 90% of the work . I’m sure they would like to spend their time during a pandemic with their loved ones & not guiding narcissists up fixed ropes & ladders & then making their meals. I don’t understand how these climbers thought it was… Read more »

Craig Quigley
Craig Quigley
2 months ago
Reply to  Everest

I’m actually losing brain cells reading the comment section on here.

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85yota
85yota
2 months ago
Reply to  Everest

I would love to know if there literally out of oxygen because of Everest expeditions.. That seems far fetched and if Thats true a lot of countries should have helped long ago..getting upset about someones decision to scale a mountain is rediculous to me

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Victor
Victor
2 months ago
Reply to  85yota

I don’t think so. Listen to The podcast on alanarnette.com with Lukas Furtenbach about cancelling the expedition. There is a practical limit to the help the remaining O’s would do. Also the risk of operators going bankrupt (and then a part of tourism) was one I haven’t thought of.

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Chris
Chris
2 months ago
Reply to  Everest

Well it’s NOT the narcissists,you silly fool.Everyone is allowed to have a dream and an ambition.In that case go and speak to the GREEDY and selfish Nepali government who’s been issuing permit and opened the season!!!!

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Don Paul
Don Paul
2 months ago

Remember folks, the body recovery costs $75,000 dollars more. Almost nobody buys it, so the bodies just pile up.

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Lenore Jones
Lenore Jones
2 months ago
Reply to  Don Paul

What was the point of this remark and your link the other day? Bodies get buried at sea, too. Are you complaining about that?

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Bob
Bob
2 months ago

So sad that the trolls have latched onto this site. It’s great that someone takes the time to keep us informed about what is occurring in these mountains that so many people have an interest in. Now these people have to pick apart each story to find something to be angry or miserable about. What an unhappy life it must be to see the world in such a negative way.

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