Everest: Purja Reaches Camp 3

8000ers Everest
Climbers move up Everest. Photo: Nirmal Purja

After studying the weather, Nirmal Purja decided to bring his team up to Camp 3, despite the heavy snowfall and “crazy horrendous winds” of the past several days.

“As soon as we started trailblazing and opening the route, [a] few other climbers followed,” he wrote. “All my team are in good health at Camp 3. They had dinner and are fast asleep. I’m checking the weather and planning for tomorrow.”

Colin O’Brady has also decided to continue, although he is still in Camp 2. “After three long days trapped in my tent at Camp 2, the storm finally broke and the weather is currently perfect,” he reported. “Tomorrow I resume my summit push, with my day’s objective being to move up to Camp 3.”

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About the Author

Jerry Kobalenko

Jerry Kobalenko

Jerry Kobalenko is the editor of ExplorersWeb. Canada's premier arctic traveler, he is the author of The Horizontal Everest and Arctic Eden, and is currently working on a book about adventures in Labrador. In 2018, he was awarded the Polar Medal by the Governor General of Canada.

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Don Paul
Don Paul
2 months ago

Nims is looking a little overconfident this time. On the K2 Winter ascent, he could push his expert Sherpa team right to the edge of what they could do, like the leader of a team of commandos. Some of them were pretty well frostbitten. This time, his team is made of high $$$ Mount Everest clients. When pushed to the brink, who knows what they will do.

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Last edited 2 months ago by Don Paul
Marie
Marie
2 months ago
Reply to  Don Paul

I agree. – I know it is totally off-topic but I keep seeing “likes” (red thumbs up) for other users’ comments from me which I have not put there myself! Therefore I have to check all the comments in up to 6 articles back in time on a daily basis and “unlike” them again. Does anyone know how to fix this problem? I don’t like to see my alter ego liking comments which I don’t agree with. Thank you in advance.

+4
MuddyBoots
MuddyBoots
2 months ago
Reply to  Don Paul

Don Paul, excellent points. I also wonder about Nims decision-making regarding avalanche danger. Does he have the experience and training to understand avalanche danger?

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Onegin
Onegin
2 months ago
Reply to  MuddyBoots

Literally a retarded comment.

He has been a professional high altitude guide and irrespective of the bombastic statements and marketing, has as strong and safe a track record as anyone…

I have never climbed with him and do not know him, but do feel that the vitriol (envy?) i gets a bit out of hand here.

As a former spetsnaz operator and mountain specialist, I think he knows what he’s doing…

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Benny Smith
Benny Smith
2 months ago
Reply to  Onegin

I really don’t see how a special forces background make you an avalanche expert. And of course I hope he knows he knows what he is doing. That his actions and statements are subject to controversy may be due to his ego being bigger than that of Reinhold Messner. I just hope nobody dies up there during this very late summit bid.

+8
Dax
Dax
2 months ago
Reply to  Benny Smith

No avalanche risk beyond Khumbu !

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Twinkletoes
Twinkletoes
2 months ago
Reply to  Dax

What was it again that happened to Camp 3?

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Apy
Apy
2 months ago
Reply to  Twinkletoes

Apparently not much since Nims reached it

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Tracey
Tracey
2 months ago
Reply to  Twinkletoes

Are you trying to be amusing & referring to base camp? Yes there was a bloody great earthquake there that both killed & injured people, but it is below the Khumbu glaciers not above it. However, the person who said there is no avalanche danger above the Khumbu glaciers & icefall could very well be proven wrong this year, the conditions are perfect for one.
Intrepid skier & amateur Mountaineer, but have had fantastic adventures & learned the hard way as a teenager

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Twinkletoes
Twinkletoes
2 months ago
Reply to  Benny Smith

Purja was a “cold weather warfare specialist”, don’t know what exactly that entails, but snow would surely be on the menu.
There are special army units that specialize in mountain terrain, e.g. in Switzerland and France (that I know of), and they do some serious mountaineering. Add combat engagement (which the Swiss and French units don’t do afaik) and you could have a spetsnaz with avalanche expertise. Of course, whether these units’re actually up to date with snow research I couldn’t tell… For instance I’ve been told France is lagging behind in matters of avalanche safety. Anyway.

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Max Madera
Max Madera
2 months ago
Reply to  Twinkletoes

Nims himself, in various interviews, said that he had no previous experience on high mountains before his “coming of age” in 2012, where he learned to use crampons in EBC.

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Apy
Apy
2 months ago
Reply to  Benny Smith

We can be put off by Nims’ ego but he is a highly trained and experienced mountaineer. In the SF he was a cold weather and high altitude specialist. In 2017 he opened the Everest summit route for the Gurkas and in 2019 at K2 all the main teams had left when he arrived and again successfully opened the route for about 30 climbers. Let’s pray that this time also all goes well.

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Kendo
Kendo
2 months ago
Reply to  Benny Smith

Come on people, mountains are mountains and always pose a risk. No- one, “expert”, is immune to the dangers and unpredictability of avalanche

+2
Lenore Jones
Lenore Jones
2 months ago
Reply to  Onegin

Hey, can you not use “retarded”? It is a hurtful word to many.

+6
Hugo Torres
2 months ago
Reply to  Onegin

Fully agree with you Onegin!!!!!

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Samantha Cara Carstens
Samantha Cara Carstens
2 months ago
Reply to  MuddyBoots

Exactly what I asked on his IG post

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Max Madera
Max Madera
2 months ago
Reply to  MuddyBoots

Regardless of what one may think of Nims (as an old man used to reading books from the pioneers, his PR social media twits and the like, always sounded totally superficial and empty, if not fake, but of course I don’t know the person, just commenting on the personna), what nobody can take out of him is his unbelievable record of security and success reaching the summits. He has always delivered. Someone was commenting on frostbittening in the winter K2 expedition summit team. Well, the amazing thing is how all made it and how little it was.

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Apy
Apy
2 months ago
Reply to  Max Madera

As a combat tested SF (presumably in Afghanistan) specialized in cold weather and high altitude warfare, and in view of his track record up till now, we can presume that Nims is not totally foolhardy. The foolish ones are rather his clients who pay fortunes to expose their lives.

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Ronald
Ronald
2 months ago
Reply to  MuddyBoots

Nims seems to have a perfect understanding of the mountains. But i wonder if his 100% record on 8000meter peaks influences his decision making due to ego. I certainly hope not. He is an excellent climber, strong, positive and determined. Good luck to his clients and himself.

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Samantha Cara Carstens
Samantha Cara Carstens
2 months ago
Reply to  Don Paul

Nim is being over ambitious anddaring. Putting his team in unnecessary danger.. Prevention I always better than cure.. Colin Brady too

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Marie
Marie
2 months ago

Sanna Raistakka wrote already 4 days ago on Instagram (see picture) that the Khumbu Icefall is getting more dangerous to traverse by the day. Apart from this, one just cannot rule out or control the risk of avalanches under these conditions – even as an experienced guide – let alone the very substantial risk of COVID manifesting itself higher up or on descent. So all in all, I find it really reckless to go on with it.

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623CAFED-8EDA-4162-9A1F-A21E40854778.jpeg
Don Paul
Don Paul
2 months ago
Reply to  Marie

There’s a lot of money changing hands in these commercial expeditions. One of the basic rules of business is that the customer is always right. I also have a kind of cynical opinion, that part of the allure of Mt Everest, K2 etc. are the fatality statistics. This is what they always want to brag about. The climbs are mostly “walk ups” and many of them do not even bring ice axes. If it’s steep, they just pull on jumars. The challenge is from factors that are not even in the climbers’ control.

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Marie
Marie
2 months ago
Reply to  Don Paul

I try to see the situation from the viewpoint of a Sherpa that’s on Nirmal Purja’s team. Even if this Sherpa considered it too dangerous to go on with the expedition, like many other experienced climbing Sherpas from other teams did and still do, it would probably be almost impossible for him to back out, as I am sure that NP does not take a “No” for an answer and will make sure that this Sherpa will be out of business for the rest of his life (at least in Nepal). I don’t care as much about the mostly narcissistic… Read more »

Mike H
Mike H
2 months ago

Looks like NIMS in his latest video from camp 3 has his left hand ✍️ in some kind of bandage / cast. Anybody knows what happened to him?

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Apy
Apy
2 months ago
Reply to  Mike H

Nims & Co have now reached C4 and plan to summit Everest tonight & Lhotse tomorrow.

+1
Brian Campbell
Brian Campbell
2 months ago

Folks, he’s neither Spetsnaz (Russian) or Special Forces (American Green Beret), he’s former British SAS (Special Air Service). All are as good as you get, but definitely different types of soldiers.
For example, American Army Rangers and Navy SEAL’s are neither, they are SOF (Special Operations Forces).
All are superb soldiers, just different training and mission types.

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Robert McGarvie
Robert McGarvie
2 months ago
Reply to  Brian Campbell

You are correct. And American Navy Seals are sailors, not soldiers. As you say SOF with Army Rangers and Air Force SOF.

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Tom cripps
Tom cripps
2 months ago
Reply to  Brian Campbell

The UK Special Forces (UKSF) is made up of the both the Special Air Service (SAS) and the Special Boat Service (SBS), the difference being the SAS is a unit of the Army whereas the SBS is a unit of the Navy. Nims was in the Brigade of Ghurkas while in the army and became the first Ghurka to pass selection and become an SBS operator. Great to see that the full team summited and are safely back at camp 4!

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Apy
Apy
2 months ago
Reply to  Tom cripps

To add to Nim’s credentials: in 2017 when the Gurkha Brigade organized an expedition on Everest to mark their 200th anniversary, he was detached as a Medic/Consultant and when the normal sherpas failed to fix the ropes to the summit, he, together with 2 other SF operators, did the job themselves.And less well-known, he has a post graduate diploma in “Security and Risk Management” from a Southampton University. “Who dares wins” (SAS motto)

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Brian Campbell
Brian Campbell
2 months ago
Reply to  Tom cripps

My mistake about Nims being SAS. SBS doesn’t get the accolades that SAS does but I understand their selection is just as difficult.

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Onegin
Onegin
2 months ago
Reply to  Brian Campbell

This is how we call it in my country (Spetsnaz). It means troops for special projects.

I do not know if it is similar to what you have mentioned. Our team is elite soldier…toughest, strongest, most prepared.

This is why I am not surprised he is such strong climber

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Brian Campbell
Brian Campbell
2 months ago
Reply to  Onegin

Spetsnaz are definitely tough, well-trained and formidable soldiers.

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Twinkletoes
Twinkletoes
2 months ago
Reply to  Brian Campbell

OK I know these distinctions can seem super important to some people but for the general public, they are entirely academic. We say special forces or spetsnaz as a general term for some specialized military force.

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Brian Campbell
Brian Campbell
2 months ago
Reply to  Twinkletoes

True.. 🙂

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Marie
Marie
2 months ago

OMG he’s going up with people who need a whole day from South Col to C4, are super tired already and think that Sherpa is a profession (“people who chose to Sherpa as a profession”). It’s madness and they are in great danger. Somebody’s got to stop him from dragging them up any further. https://www.boldbravebeautiful.com/summit-notes/mount-everest-nepal

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Apy
Apy
2 months ago
Reply to  Marie

It’s the clients who push the guides never the guides who push the clients.

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Hmmm
Hmmm
2 months ago

I’m so surprised, all the people are so worried about others than themselves.

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Marie
Marie
2 months ago
Reply to  Hmmm

It’s due to a human quality called “empathy”. However, not everyone possesses it.

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Last edited 2 months ago by Marie
Fritz B
Fritz B
2 months ago

As always, the mountain will decide. The mountain does not care who you are, what you have done in the past or how much money you have. People forget that.

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Dawn Staley
Dawn Staley
2 months ago

The Sherpas are the real kings of the mountains. Without Sherpas the “westerners” wouldn’t stand a chance at climbing any mountain. Even Kilimanjaro use porters from that region. The real mountaineers were the ones that climbed the mountains before 1970’s!

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