More Everest Summits; Purja to Lead Lhotse Climb Tomorrow

8000ers Everest
Nirmal Purja in Camp 4 yesterday. Photo: Nirmal Purja

Nirmal Purja and his team left Camp 4 last night. Despite the fresh snow, they summited Everest today at 7 am.

Summiters included Purja, five clients, photographer Sandro Gromen-Hayes, and nine Sherpa guides. They are now back in Camp 4. Next, Purja will lead three clients (Jenn Drummond, Adriana Brownlee, and Marie-Pier Desharnais) to Lhotse, supported by five Sherpa.

Pioneer Expeditions also reports that four clients and six Sherpa have summited. For all the Sherpas, this marked their second or third Everest summits of the season. The website 8000ers.com reports that Kuluar, a team working with Seven Summit Treks, also reached the top, although the number of climbers is unknown.

Yesterday, climbers in Camp 2 were shocked by the impact of a monster avalanche. The avalanche came down from Nuptse, far from the camp, but the huge shockwave flattened a large number of tents.

Tashi Lakpa Sherpa,  Director of Seven Summit Treks, stated that he had not seen anything like it during his 19 previous Everest expeditions. After the avalanche, Climbalaya Expeditions removed all their clients from the mountain. Csaba Varga, climbing without O2 or Sherpa support, also deemed it too risky to continue.

Colin O’Brady has stayed. Climbing with Pemba Sherpa and a member of the Seven Summit Treks team, he plans to reach Camp 4 today.

Fortunately, the normal route on Everest’s south side is relatively safe from avalanches, although a small avalanche did partly damage Camp 3 three days ago.

Those going for Lhotse tomorrow may encounter more dangerous conditions on its summit couloir.

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About the Author

Angela Benavides

Angela Benavides

Senior journalist, published author and communication consultant. Specialized on high-altitude mountaineering, with an interest for everything around the mountains: from economics to geopolitics. After five years exploring distant professional ranges, I returned to ExWeb BC in 2018. Feeling right at home since then!

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Paul
Paul
3 months ago

There is more teams that summited today:
-Pioneer Expeditions: 10 members on the summit (4 clients and 6 Sherpas)
-Kuluar Team from SST, unknown number of Summiters (info from Dawa Sherpa)

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Kelly
Kelly
3 months ago

Haters busy hating. Nims is busy climbing

+7
Marie
Marie
3 months ago
Reply to  Kelly

There are countless people that are good at their job that consists of creating things and saving lives. Nims neither creates anything, nor does he save anybody. On the contrary: He endangers people’s lives and uses up precious resources. There’s nothing glorious about climbing a mountain for a lot of money – as opposed to a doctor’s, nurse’s, composer’s, cancer researcher’s, rescue worker’s, author’s, bus driver’s… job.

+4
Apy
Apy
3 months ago
Reply to  Marie

You forget that for better or for worse, climbing is still the main source of revenue for the sherpas.

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Sid
Sid
3 months ago
Reply to  Marie

Never seen anybody say the same about the western climbing guides. And remember who started climbing for profit first. If there’s nothing glorious about climbing a mountain or adventure in general, aren’t you at the wrong website? I’m not sure what a composer or an author adds to the world if a climber isn’t. Seeing a world class rock climber climb up a route is like watching a symphony of human movement, or a K2 winter climb a composition of human suffering. And don’t put doctors on that high of a pedestal. At least in the western countries, they get… Read more »

Last edited 3 months ago by dennelli84
Marie
Marie
3 months ago
Reply to  Sid

Hi Apy, regarding your argument that climbing is still the main source of income for the Sherpas, I fully agree with you (and even made this point before on this site) that providing this source is a good thing – IF it is done responsibly, without endangering the Sherpa’s lives recklessly in the making. Sid, please be reminded that not only Western guides and expedition leaders have acknowledged the too-big-risk at the moment, but also almost all Nepalese guides and leaders save Nims. As to climbing in general, you caught me flat-footed; indeed I believe that climbing is only glorious… Read more »

Sid
Sid
3 months ago
Reply to  Marie

Yes, all the other guides did go down. And I would have done so too. Even in the photos posted yesterday, there were avalanche sloughs in the picture. Big red flag! But success on the mountain is based on getting back down alive after summitting. Seems like Purja is doing that (we’ll know for a sure in a day or two). In the end, the best way to understand the conditions is to get outside the tent and check it out. So, in that regard, Purja has better conditions data than me sitting behind a computer. I do find it… Read more »

Marie
Marie
3 months ago
Reply to  Sid

The difference is that O’Brady is only responsible for himself, whereas N. Purja as a guide is responsible for people that may not be very experienced and skilled and totally depend on him. Even if the weather is fine, they might develop some form of altitude sickness, break a leg, get COVID symptoms, whatever, and then there are even fewer options to get them down than usual. Also his Sherpas must be under a lot of pressure in light of all the facts and probably could not really say “no” to him. Looking back at all the comments and articles… Read more »

Apy
Apy
3 months ago
Reply to  Marie

Hi Marie. Thanks for your message. Just a few points. 1) Commercial climbing as it is practised today is just a Roman circus, a Western disease. Is it wise for a mother of seven to risk her life by climbing the Everest just because “she wants to find her true inner self?” I’ll let you be judge. 2) Are sherpas being exploited? Most probably by some. The annual income in Nepal is about US$ 600 p.a. Sherpas may make 5 to 10 times more. But they would still need to work 10 to 20 years to make what Western clients… Read more »

MuddyBoots
MuddyBoots
3 months ago
Reply to  Apy

Api, I agree with most of what you wrote EXCEPT calling Nims “the most talented and experienced mountaineer today”. That is crazy. He is physically and mentally exceptional, and strong on planning and logistics. But Nims’ entire moutaineering experience has been on standard routes, most of them set with ropes before he arrived. And he always climbs with highly experienced partners. Part of the reason he has never lost any partners is that his partners are arguably more experienced than he is (smart move on his part!) and because until K2 he never tried to do anything that was out-there-never… Read more »

Apy
Apy
3 months ago
Reply to  MuddyBoots

Muddy Boots. Your point is well taken.

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Don
Don
3 months ago
Reply to  Kelly

🙌🏼🙌🏼🙌🏼 what a true professional, as well as champion for his guides and the Nepalese people. He will change the world.

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Mrtn
Mrtn
3 months ago
Reply to  Kelly

LOL. Bitter people out here, have you read his book! He spared his life to save others meanwhile you are hate posting from the couch at home get a grip

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Marie
Marie
3 months ago
Reply to  Mrtn

Instead of hate posting against me, I wish you came up with one single argument to prove me wrong. Many experienced mountaineers considered the risk of summiting too big in light of the avalanche danger and Covid, and that (hopefully) nothing serious happened is due to sheer luck. Of course you can play Russian roulette with your clients and later praise yourself on Instagram that nobody died, but it’s still not your merit that the bullet was in the other chamber. The true hero of this season in my eyes is Mr Furtenbach who was the first to call the… Read more »

Marie
Marie
3 months ago
Reply to  Mrtn

PS: You’d better get a grip on reality: https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=ZpWG52_HL0E

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Last edited 3 months ago by Marie
Benny Smith
Benny Smith
3 months ago

I guess if Reinhold Messner was the same age as Nims he would be equally unsympathetic as him, with all the Instagram posing etc. the big difference being that Messner would still condemn leading customers to the 8000ers summits who otherwise would not have been able to get there.
However as an athlete and climber, Nims has proven more than once that he is part of the climbing elite. I don’t praise his commercial operations but I don’t hate him either.

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MuddyBoots
MuddyBoots
3 months ago
Reply to  Benny Smith

Nims has proven that he has exceptional strength and capability on standard routes of the highly PR-able 8k peaks. He has never done anything new. Or unsupported. His resume is perfect for guiding high-ticket climbs for tourists. I’m pretty sure Messner would consider Nims a really talented tour guide. Maybe Nims could have been a great mountaineer, but it appears he has chosen the high-altitude athlete and tour-guide path.

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Tadeu Graciolli Guimarães
Tadeu Graciolli Guimarães
3 months ago

Any news about Marek Holecek and Radoslav Groh, the true heroes of this season?

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William S.
William S.
3 months ago

They’re both back in Kathmandu, safe and sound.

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MuddyBoots
MuddyBoots
3 months ago

Indeed they are. And hopefully Holecek and Groh will get the accolades they deserve when we learn more. Holecek was trying to raise money for a feature film, and I hope they managed to get some video or even stills of this climb.

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