Updated: More Summits on Everest; No Go on Lhotse

8000ers Everest
rock, snow, and ice on the Everest summit pyramid.
Everest summit pyramid yesterday. Photo: Colin O'Brady

More climbers summited Everest today, including several teams outfitted by Seven Summit Treks. Summiters included Jon Kedrowski, Mike Posner, and Colin O’Brady.

O’Brady was going to make his ascent without O2, but changed his mind when his wife, Jenna Besaw, decided that she also wanted a crack at the summit of Everest. She was originally planning to go only to Camp 2. Like everyone else, he also abandoned his plans to climb Lhotse. At the time of writing, he has returned to Camp 2.

India’s NIM-JIM&WS team, with six clients and six Sherpas, also reached the top. Their outfitter, Asian Trekking, praised the climbers’ effort and determination after they had to push all the way from Camp 2 to Camp 4 yesterday. Camp 3 had been flattened by an avalanche right before their push. Despite very little rest, they summited.

The route on Lhotse follows a steep couloir leading to the summit. Photo: Jonathan Lamy

There’s no concrete news from Lhotse but the little information available suggests there have been no summits. Climber Carlos Garranzo wrote on social media that there could have been an avalanche, though there are no reports of injuries, and that climbers are heading down to Camp 2. Jenn Drummond, a member of Nirmal Purja’s team attempting Lhotse, has returned from Camp 4 to Camp 2, according to her tracker. Another Lhotse hopeful, Adriana Brownlee, summited Everesst but is now back at BC. Further news is expected from Purja’s Elite Exped team and Seven Summit Treks, including Ukrainians Oleg Ivanchenko and Petro Shamborovskyy.

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About the Author

Angela Benavides

Angela Benavides

Senior journalist, published author and communication consultant. Specialized on high-altitude mountaineering, with an interest for everything around the mountains: from economics to geopolitics. After five years exploring distant professional ranges, I returned to ExWeb BC in 2018. Feeling right at home since then!

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Climber
Climber
11 days ago

Maybe Obrady took o2
Its a Marketing thing to reach more followers i guess….
Göttler and jornet decided to stop they attempt, they only reach camp 4

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Last edited 11 days ago by Climber
Dave
Dave
11 days ago
Reply to  Climber

Apparently he and his wife both summited on O2

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Climber
Climber
11 days ago
Reply to  Dave

What a jerk talking like a king and than be quiet until the end 😂

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Lily
Lily
11 days ago
Reply to  Climber

Hardly a jerk when he decided to set aside his own goals to help his wife reach the summit instead.

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Merci
Merci
11 days ago
Reply to  Lily

Sure 😂 No excuse for this, just get on time o2 one day after. Its hard to get o2 Must be paid long time before the Expedition started! it was planned.

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MuddyBoots
MuddyBoots
11 days ago
Reply to  Climber

Not sayin’ Colin’s explanation isn’t true, but “I gave up my highly publicized no-Os traverse to climb with my wife because she changed her mind (and the plan) and wanted to summit” puts the best-possible spin on Colin’s performance. Isn’t it curious that they had enough O2 available at camp 2 for both Colin and the surprise climb by his wife?

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MuddyBoots
MuddyBoots
11 days ago
Reply to  MuddyBoots

Also: did Jenna have a permit for Everest? If she was only planning to climb to Camp 2, most people would have gotten a Lhotse permit for $1800 vs. the Everest permit for $11,000. EDIT: oh nevermind. Colin’s instagram says Jenna decided 2 weeks ago to try to summit and they did the proper paperwork.

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Last edited 11 days ago by MuddyBoots
Merci
Merci
10 days ago
Reply to  MuddyBoots

Each company tell you before you make the paperwork for Expedition “pls note that if you need a sherpa or o2 tell us in contract before” its hard to get on time, so….. And sure jenna has a permit long before. Colin writte in his IG few hours before he leave C4 to the summit with hashtags “everestLhotseNo02” and than his IG secretary write on summit day he do it for his wife 😅🥱

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Paul
Paul
11 days ago

O’Brady almost in Camp 3, he didn’t turn toward Lhotse so looks like he is not following the plan.

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Big Talker
Big Talker
11 days ago
Reply to  Paul

I think everyone knew from the very start that it was not going to happen. Just one of those guys that talks big but delivers very little.

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glu
glu
11 days ago
Reply to  Big Talker

I mean, if he made it to the top of Everest without using O2, that’s already a big achievement in itself frankly

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Alex
Alex
11 days ago
Reply to  Big Talker

Whatever you may personally about Colin — reaching the top of the world without oxygen, on its own, is an elite amongst elite achievements. There really isn’t anything more to add. It’s that simple.

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Tara
Tara
11 days ago
Reply to  Alex

As I understood he summited on O2. And using fixed ropes is not “climbing on its own”.

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Alex
Alex
11 days ago
Reply to  Tara

I posted this before that was known…

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Alex
Alex
11 days ago
Reply to  Tara

I said climbing Everest on its own without oxygen (as opposed to Everest and Lhotse) is a major achievement on its own. I never said on HIS* own/unsupported.

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Last edited 11 days ago by Alex
Benny Smith
Benny Smith
11 days ago
Reply to  Alex

Then he should climb K2 without O2 and without fixed ropes. There really isn’t anything more to add.

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Blabla
Blabla
11 days ago
Reply to  Alex

If by “on his own” you mean that nobody carried him on his back the top then yes, you are correct.

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Alex
Alex
11 days ago
Reply to  Blabla

I said on its own…but hey who’s reading?

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Tara
Tara
10 days ago
Reply to  Alex

Right, I’m sorry for reading inattentively. But anyway, pulling oneself on fixed ropes is not elite achivement in climbing, even on the big ones. Elite achivement is climbing a new route in a big, steep wall with no support, especially if it’s done alpine style.

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Alex
Alex
10 days ago
Reply to  Tara

I guess we have different definitions of elite. Last I checked less than 200 people in the world have reached the summit of Everest without oxygen. That to me is pretty elite…200 in a world of nearly 8 billion.

There are only a handful of people in the world capable of climbing Everest without O.

Maybe I would use the word “legendary” vs elite to describe what you’re talking about 😂. To even make it into the NBA you have to be an elite basketball player…that doesn’t mean you touch the Michael Jordan’s of the world.

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Max Madera
Max Madera
9 days ago
Reply to  Alex

I take that very few people can summit Everest without O2. But that does not make the feat elite among the elite of mountaineering. Climbing mountains at the highest level is about a different thing. You need the exposure and the adventure-novelty first. Then you can add the no O2 as a cherry on the pie if the mountain is a tall eighthousander. Kukuczka was elite among the elite although he did not summit Everest without O2, while others did. Colin O’Brady would not be elite among the elite just by following the ropes equipped by others, surrounded by sherpa… Read more »

Apy
Apy
11 days ago

Ropes on Lhotse covered by too much snow so all expeditions to summit cancelled.

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Apy
Apy
11 days ago

No news from Nims. What is he up to?

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Apy
Apy
11 days ago
Reply to  Apy

He’s back at BC having summited Everest but not Lhotse

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barbara
barbara
11 days ago
Reply to  Apy

yep. nims last instapost doesn’t refer to why but in the commentaries it’s said that it’s been to dangerous to try lhotse.

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Tal
Tal
10 days ago
Reply to  barbara

Yes, Nims said nothing about this rare failure to achieve a goal in his post. Bearing in mind how much time he spends lauding his own (very considerable) leadership skills, it would have been good to have read about his decision-making process re Lhotse. So he stood down, owing to avalanche risk? Or because his clients were too tired? Or because they couldn’t access the ropes in the deep snow? He should speak about it openly. Let’s hear about what happened. No matter how well you plan to pull something off, sometimes it is necessary to stand down, owing to… Read more »

Apy
Apy
10 days ago
Reply to  Tal

One of Nims client, Marie Pier Desharnais, explains very clearly what happened. She left Everest very quickly and reached 8100m on Lhotse. There the snow was 1m deep making trailblazing very difficult and progression very slow, the ropes were buried deep in the snow and advancing in that snow would create a danger of avalanche. So they deemed it wiser to stop. All the other teams, Russian, Indian etc… faced the same problem and nobody summited Lhotse that day. Of course Nims’ egomania makes it impossible for him to admit what he might consider a failure, even if it was… Read more »

Tal
Tal
10 days ago
Reply to  Apy

Many thanks for the informative reply!

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Semaj
Semaj
11 days ago

Whoopee doo dee😂

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LeadmanDan
LeadmanDan
11 days ago

He just posted that he and his wife summitted but both took oxygen. Apparently she changed here mind and wanted to get above camp 2. and he took O2 to support her.

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MuddyBoots
MuddyBoots
11 days ago

The attention paid to Covid and the weather this year has obscured another interesting development for Everest tourism: a very high Sherpa/client ratio. Nims had 6 clients, and 10 Sherpas (including himself) as guides. The Bahraini team also had a very high ratio. And why so many sherpas? Sure, it is good for their resume for every Sherpa to have a chance to climb…but I suspect that they were needed to carry plenty of O2 for clients. In the case of the Bahraini team, SST called them “VVIP” clients, and their VVIP program provides 12 bottles O2 per climber as… Read more »

Last edited 11 days ago by MuddyBoots
Paul
Paul
11 days ago
Reply to  MuddyBoots

Generally do not matter if you use two or twelve bottles, O2 support is O2 support. For sure it increase the safety of climbers what is good, the bad thing is that some of the bottles will be dumped, and another that it will attract more tourists there because will be much easier (Jenna decided two weeks ago to go to the top and made it… WTF?! ) And more Sherpas for sure is needed to carry all this O2, so above C4 some goes as guides and some as O2 carriers. But thats good for them – more people… Read more »

MuddyBoots
MuddyBoots
11 days ago
Reply to  Paul

Yes, using any amount of O2 disqualifies on from a no-O2 climb. But having 12 bottles for your summit attempt vs. 3-6 bottles is a huge difference in performance, safety and risk of frostbite. More bottles/higher flow rate effectively reduces the effects of altitude on the body:
https://8kpeak.com/pages/climbing-with-supplemental-oxygen-by-the-numbers

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Pawel
Pawel
10 days ago
Reply to  MuddyBoots

yes, I understand it, more O2 = more easy, but as you said: using any amount of O2 disqualifies on from a no-O2 climb so why not made it more safe. The fact that there was only 4 deaths this season is mostly because of lots of O2 and many Sherpas

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MuddyBoots
MuddyBoots
9 days ago
Reply to  Pawel

Not saying a hard line shouldn’t be drawn, but focusing only on the No-O2 vs any black/white dividing line obscures major differences in the gray area of O2 use. Purists argue that O2 use brings the summit down to the climber. In any other sport the use of O2 would be considered doping — so no summit credit. It’s somewhat complicated for Everest because O2 not only provides safety but also improved performance. Isn’t there a difference between O2 use a few years ago, when a minimum of O2 was provided for safety, and what is done today, where something… Read more »

Don Paul
Don Paul
11 days ago

I had thought Lhotse was comparable to Everest, maybe easier, but from that picture above, the route looks relentless and steep, with nowhere to sleep. I guess at the very bottom of the picture is the other end of the South Col of Everest?

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Last edited 11 days ago by Don Paul
Paul
Paul
9 days ago
Reply to  Don Paul

The route to Lhotse is not going by South Col. Above Camp 3 (same for Everest and Lhotse) the route diverge after Yellow Band and before Geneva Spur, it goes up the Lhotse face with Camp 4 there, after that is narrow couloir that lead to summit. The problem was with the couloir, it was full of snow creating avalanche danger. Generally this routh is not hard, just the condition made it dangerous.

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Phipu
Phipu
6 days ago

Why hasn’t this gotten some attention? According to her Instagram, Kristin Harila summited Everest and Lhotse on the same day, May 23rd. 6:30am she was on everest and “at sunset” on Lhotse. If sunset was around 7pm, this was pretty fast. While Nims holds the record with 10h15min to do this, 12h30min is still much faster than the record before Nims (20h).
I honestly have no idea if everything is true and verified as the media attention seems pretty much nonexistant.

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