A High-Risk Mission To Retrieve Alex Goldfarb’s Remains

The four rescuers on their way to Pastori Peak. Photo: A. Ali Porik/Jasmine Tours
Four highly experienced Pakistani climbers landed earlier today at Concordia on a mission to retrieve the body of Alex Goldfarb from a highly hazardous area on Pastori Peak, where the Russian-American climber fell to his death two days ago.
The mission, arranged by Jasmine Tours, consists of Sadiq Sadpara, with previous summits of K2, G1, G2, Broad Peak, and Nanga Parbat; Mustafa Shigri, who has already climbed Pastori Peak and has twice reached Broad Peak’s foresummit; Ali Muhammad Sadpara, a K2 and G2 summiter, and Ashraf, who has previously reached Broad Peak’s foresummit and topped Spantik. Note that these Sadparas are not the same as those currently on K2 with John Snorri, although all were born in the village of Sadpara.
The climbers landed at the part of Concordia where the Baltoro and Godwin-Austen Glaciers join. They then trekked to Broad Peak Base Camp for the night and will begin their retrieval mission tomorrow morning, says spokesperson Laszlo Pinter. The helicopter will pick them up in three days. The forecast is for bad weather during their entire time on the mountain.

Sharp spires, unstable rock, and crevassed glaciers make Pastori anything but easy, despite its “trekking peak” designation. Photo: Jasmine Tours

Pastori is classified as a trekking peak because of its comparatively low altitude, but the 6,209m Peak is steep, heavily crevassed, and treacherous with unstable sections and constant rockfall. No wonder that it is rarely climbed, even in summer. 
As well as a seasoned climber, Dr. Goldfarb was a physician, specializing in critical care — including attending severely-ill COVID patients — at hospitals in the Boston area. Judging from the messages of condolence and tribute piling up on ExplorersWeb and elsewhere from friends, family, and colleagues, he seems to have left a powerful impression on everyone.
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About the Author

Angela Benavides

Angela Benavides

Senior journalist, published author and communication consultant. Specialized on high-altitude mountaineering, with an interest for everything around the mountains: from economics to geopolitics. After five years exploring distant professional ranges, I returned to ExWeb BC in 2018. Feeling right at home since then!

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Farukh Ali
Farukh Ali
4 months ago

Wouldn’t it be safer to use a helicopter rope or ladder to lift the body? Military do use such technique which is called SPIE (Special Patrol Insertion/Extraction).

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Naveed
Naveed
4 months ago

CORRECTION… Concordia is not a glacier, rather, its a place of confluence of two great glaciers, Godwin Austin Glacier and Baltoro Glacier

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Jerry Kobalenko
Admin
4 months ago
Reply to  Naveed

Thanks, corrected.

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Blabla
Blabla
4 months ago

The safest thing would be just leaving his body there. Climbing dangerous mountains is selfish, but risking rescuer’s life for retrieving a dead body using crowdfunding money is simply nasty. The family should be ashamed.

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Jerry Kobalenko
Admin
4 months ago
Reply to  Blabla

While the family crowdfunded for the original search, when it was thought that Goldfarb might still be alive, it is unclear how the retrieval operation is being funded, or by whom.

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