The Longest Walk in the World

Explorers are constantly looking for new adventures and world firsts to accomplish. One mouthwatering, still-undone route is the longest continuous walk in the world.

In 2019, reddit user cbz3000 played around on Google Maps to find the longest route that you could walk without having to cross an ocean. Stretching 22,387km, it runs from Cape Town, South Africa to Magadan, Russia.

It crosses 16 countries: South Africa, Botswana, Zimbabwe, Zambia, Tanzania, Uganda, South Sudan, Sudan, Georgia, Egypt, Jordan, Syria, Turkey, Romania, Belarus, and Russia.

The route ascends a total of 117,693m and descends 117,686m –- the equivalent of 13 Mount Everests. Google estimates that it takes 4,492 hours (187 days) to walk the entire distance, but in Google’s infinite wisdom, this is 24 hours a day, no breaks! More reasonably, if you walked eight hours a day, the walk would take 562 days to complete, not including rest days.

In the 1970s, Dave Kunst became the first person to walk completely around the earth. It took him four years. Steven Newman was the first to walk solo around the world. Fyona Campbell walked for 11 years across America, Africa and Europe, and Rosie Swale Pope ran around the world in 2003. The idea of walking across the world is not new, but this route is.

Perhaps the reason that this has never been attempted is the risk that accompanies it. The route is littered with visa restrictions, war-torn regions, civil wars, and unstable governments. Besides politics, anyone who attempted it would need exceptional skills to tackle the constantly changing terrain and temperatures.

Two years ago, ExplorersWeb reported on another straight-line route that two scientists suggested might be the longest continuous walk. But that was only 11,000km. This current one is twice as long.

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About the Author

Rebecca McPhee

Rebecca is a freelance writer and science teacher based in the UK.

She is a keen traveler and has been lucky enough to backpack her way around Africa, South America, and Asia. With a background in marine biology, she is interested in everything to do with the oceans and aims to dive and open-water swim in as many seas as possible.

Her areas of expertise include open water sports, marine wildlife and adventure travel.

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jmaf
jmaf
1 day ago

To make this survivable you would need to set up an almost impossible series of guides and handlers with the requisite local/tribal access to get you safely through the areas you can’t just wander through. Add to that the red tape and corruption you would have to navigate and this thing becomes more of a test of ones bureaucratic and logistics skills than a physical endurance test.

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Twinkletoes
Twinkletoes
1 day ago
Reply to  jmaf

It would be a great achievement for humanity it it was to come together. And not impossible, I think

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Max Madera
Max Madera
1 day ago

Check the world map! There is no way the route goes through Romania or Belarus. It may skip oceans, but not huge water masses, I am not talking about rivers here. You cannot go from Tanzania to Uganda by land: you need to cross lake Victoria; neither can you go from Egypt to Jordan without crossing the Red sea.

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Twinkletoes
Twinkletoes
1 day ago
Reply to  Max Madera

Yeah more like Azerbaijan and Georgia. That being said I don’t agree with your water bodies there. First off it does say no oceans so there. More in detail, I can’t speak about lake Victoria but counting the Suez Canal as part of the Red Sea doesn’t make any sense.

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Max Madera
Max Madera
16 hours ago
Reply to  Twinkletoes

I didn’t read Israel among the set of countries that you have to cross. There is no other way to go from Egypt to Jordania directly except by navigating the Red Sea.

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mona
mona
1 day ago
Reply to  Max Madera

Tanzania, Uganda –> Tanzania, Rwanda, Uganda is all on land

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Max Madera
Max Madera
16 hours ago
Reply to  mona

Yeap, but then you go through Rwanda. You can also avoid navigating the Red sea by going through Israel. You still have to cross the Suez canal.

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max muster
max muster
14 hours ago

the description doesn’t match the google maps suggestion, which does include ferries to get to that distance.otherwise it is longer and passes other countries. if you think going from turkey to russia takes you through belarus you should have another look at the map.
overall i think explorersweb covers interesting topics, but it would be worth trying to adhere to journalistic standards a bit more (especially for the alpinism articles of benavides)

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