“I Found One of the Bodies on K2” — An Exclusive Report

K2
The location of two of the bodies, seen from Camp 4. John Snorri, higher. Ali Sadpara, lower. All photos: Valentyn Sypavin

BY VALENTYN SYPAVIN

After the successful ascent of K2 in the summer of 2021, my team went home. All clients reached the summit, including the first Russian woman, Olga Koroleva, and the first Ukrainian woman, Irina Galay. I am very happy. However, I am haunted by the thoughts of what happened to the three brave men who attempted to summit K2 last winter but who did not return. These were Muhammad Ali Sadpara (Pakistan), John Snorri (Iceland), and Juan Pablo (JP) Mohr (Chile).

For several months, this question has haunted many people: What happened? Sajid Ali Sadpara, Ali Sadpara’s son, and Elia Saikaly launched an expedition to find out. I was there too, as an ordinary guide and climber who was leading a commercial expedition. I want to say that I grieve with all the relatives and friends of the victims and offer my sincere condolences. Here, I’m just presenting exactly what I saw and some of my assumptions.

The main questions, in my opinion, are: Did the three climbers reach the summit of K2 before they died? If so, did they all do it? And lastly, why did they die?

These questions may be answered in future by checking the cameras of the victims. But I was the first to find one body [JP Mohr] and saw two more bodies on the way to the summit 10 days ago. Since not much on these circumstances has appeared since then, I would like to offer my firsthand findings.

I first reached Camp 4 on July 26 at 11:30 am. Of course, I started photographing the Bottleneck. At this time, a team of Sherpas were working on the route below the Serac. If I am not mistaken, these were three Sherpas from our Alpomania-Pioneer team and four Sherpas from the Madison team.

I immediately noticed that two large black points lay on the route at different heights, much higher than the Bottleneck, and dark lines resembling ropes went up and down from them. After my clients reached Camp 4, I gave them tea, took 100m of rope, and went higher in order to facilitate the work on the night of the summit push.

At this time, Elia [Saikaly] attacked our sirdar, Lakpa Sherpa, saying that this was not a race and why I was I going there. I still do not understand why Elia did this, and other witnesses of the event were in shock. But after about an hour and twenty minutes, I reached the beginning of the fixed ropes and saw a yellow piece of fabric in the snow to the far left. This fabric was not visible from C4. I got curious and came closer to the fabric.

Sypavin’s watch at the time that he found the body of JP Mohr.

JP Mohr

I felt that the small piece of fabric sticking out of the snow could be attached to something bigger, even though no human traces, like parts of crampons or boots, were visible.

I immediately took a photo and video of the position of this piece of fabric relative to the Bottleneck and C4. I had an ice ax and started carefully digging. Immediately, I saw that it was a North Face yellow-and-black down suit or jacket.

I felt cold inside. Then I took out a GoPro and began to film my findings. At first, I saw the harness — which at first I took for a backpack strap — and then the top of the boots. They were the new Scarpa 8000 model with a straight zipper.

I then got to the bottom of the Petzl crampons. These were blunt. I did not recognize the model of these crampons. After realizing that the suit and the boots were new and that this was a body, I didn’t dig further.

Since a special expedition was working on the mountain to find these bodies, I decided that it was necessary to convey this information to them as soon as possible. It was then up to them to continue. I did not excavate the face of the climber or open any areas of the body. At the time, I did not know who it was because I did not know who was wearing that suit and boots.

The deceased was lying with his head facing west and his feet facing east, legs in the fetal position. The suit and boots were intact with no signs of damage from a fall or anything else.

There were no obvious unnatural body positions caused by, for example, limb fractures. There were no ropes and no backpack on his back. The body was far from the Bottleneck. If one goes down from the Serac without oxygen, it would take at least one hour to reach this place. Most likely, the climber froze and died from exhaustion.

After taking photos, I left my rope a little higher and went to C4 to tell about the body. Elia was kind to me and asked me to show the location of the body for his drone, but we did not manage to start it. Then they (Elia and Sajid) made a video where I tell about the find and show the photos on my phone. Meanwhile, the Sherpas descended to C4 without reaching the higher black dots that I saw earlier.

The summit push took place on the night of July 27, 2021. The Sherpas, clients, high altitude porters, and several Pakistani climbers were on their way. Three Sherpas (Sanu, Pemba Rita, and possibly Chiring) from the Alpomania-Pioneer team worked higher on the route.

After them, I was the first to climb on fixed ropes, followed by my clients and Sherpas. After the traverse under the Serac, the ascent began. At the end of a steep ice wall, we encountered a body. I immediately realized that this was a deceased climber. I had seen many of them on Everest. It was dark and I could not see much. I examined the body more carefully during the descent, when it was light. Here’s what I can say.

Sherpas fix ropes toward the bodies of Ali Sadpara, below, and John Snorri, above.

Ali Sadpara

The deceased was lying on his back, upside down. There were several fixed ropes around. The deceased was in a Kailas suit. The suit had faded in the sun and was intact, undamaged, untorn. He was wearing Millet boots and Petzl crampons. The crampons were very blunt. The arms were spread out to the sides. He was wearing a hood and a backpack. In other words, Ali was lying on his backpack. His left hand was ungloved. An old green rope was wrapped around the left crampon. He was wearing a harness. A figure 8 descender was attached to the rope.

It is absolutely certain that Ali was descending. The body lay on a flat surface. Since the rope was fixed to a nearby anchor, I assume that there was no fall from a height. It is possible that Ali was simply descending facing toward the mountain on the fixed ropes (in the darkness?). He may have caught his foot in the rope and fell on his back. He might have been completely exhausted and not able to get up anymore.

About 100m above, a third body hung on the fixed ropes.

John Snorri

Snorri’s location: 1. Red fixed rope; 2. Snorri’s carabiner (and body); 3. Broken snow anchor with the snagged rope; 4. Fixed rope heading down

There is a clear picture of what happened. The body hung in a fetal position, with his face to the west and his back to the east. His crampons Grivel G21+ were very blunt. His face looked down. He had no dark glasses, and the left hand did not have a glove.

Many people say that Snorri never used a descender because he went down on a carabiner, Sherpa style, with the rope wound around his hand. I can confirm that he was descending. The climber had a long lifeline that was clipped to the fixed rope with a carabiner.

The fixed rope had a lot of slack, and it played a cruel joke. During the descent, Snorri reached a snow anchor that was broken in half and caught the fixed rope. It formed a loop of fixed rope, in which Snorri found himself caught. He might not have seen it in the dark or because of fatigue. If one descends facing away from the mountain, one might not see it.

In any case, he found himself caught on a tight loop of the fixed rope. He would have had to climb to the snow anchor in order to release the snagged rope. This would be about three metres up the ice slope, on the front teeth of his crampons, without a jumar.

Alternatively, he could clip the carabiner of his lifeline from the snagged fixed rope to the proper fixed rope. This was also very difficult, as the rope was already very tight. In any case, Snorri did not have the strength to get out of this situation. I think he was just exhausted. Was it dark and cold? What was the weather? These are no longer questions for me.

Valentyn Sypavin at the site of his discovery of JP Mohr’s body.

Summary

Snorri and Sadpara were definitely descending. There were no falls and no mystery. K2 is a difficult, high mountain in winter. They started the summit push from C3 (7,330m!). I think that if there had been a tent in C4, then JP would have had chances to survive. JP is said to have moved quickly on the mountain. Most likely, he had already descended below the Bottleneck, was waiting for the others, and froze to death.

Yet another question concerns the crevasse above C3. I followed the 2021 winter ascent of K2 and read that some climbers complained that the Sherpa climbers did not warn them about a large crevasse. This crack allegedly blocked the path on the summit push and could not be bypassed.

It is very strange that I have not seen a single photo of this crevasse. It is also strange that 10 Sherpas were able to get around it. And the three deceased climbers were able to overcome it too.

In summer, there are no crevasses at all above C3, despite the fact that for six months the bodies of the deceased climbers, especially JP Mohr, lay practically on the surface. This suggests that new snow had not filled and hidden the crevasse.

This is everything that I wanted to report. Of course, further data from the photographs and video files from the cameras of the victims may further clarify what happened that day. I don’t want to speculate.

Translated by Ganna Rozhnova

EDITOR’S NOTE: While we have not posted close-up photos of the bodies, their position on the mountain may be relevant to understanding what happened. So we have included those distant shots only.

+33
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Elena
Elena
2 months ago

Thanks for posting!
Incredibly sad.. Rest in peace, heroes!

+31
akhtar
2 months ago

so sad, i was anxiously waiting to know the fact ,what was happened with them.

+14
Bill Bones
2 months ago

Im amazed those bodies were found, i was certain they were swept away by an Avalanche or Rock/Ice fall, how wrong i was!
RIP

+13
S K
S K
2 months ago

Thanks Valentyn for valuable insight into the incident and your to the point talk without any additional speculations . While though Elia posts are full of emotions and expressions, he somehow seems to be too much concerned with his documentary / production work and keep most of the details to him self just because he is making a documentary.
Hiding the truth is not going to make his video’s more popular and best seller , trust me people will reveal the facts sooner or later whether Elia tries to make it a thriller or not.

+32
MuddyBoots
MuddyBoots
2 months ago
Reply to  S K

In fairness, I think “hiding the truth” is a bit too strong. It is understandable that 1) they are still examining any digital evidence, which may take time because it sounds like it involves data recovery from malfunctioning devices 2) they have to put all that evidence together in the most coherent way and 3) They have an obligation to share any findings with the families before going public. Also, I imagine that Sajid (and Elia) are still emotionally processing their whole experience on K2 and may not be ready to share their story and information publicly. This last one… Read more »

Federica Masante
Federica Masante
2 months ago
Reply to  MuddyBoots

Beautifully put. Amen to that.

+5
MuddyBoots
MuddyBoots
2 months ago

Sad but insightful report; thank you Valentyn (and Explorersweb). A minor note, but like Valentyn I have also been wondering about the reportedly impossible-to-cross crevasse above camp 3. I wonder if the film being made about the Nepali team’s winter climb will show that as they did mention a long-ish detour to avoid a crevasse. But regarding the reports of Sajid and other climbers who turned back, I wondered if altitude had altered their depth perception and sense of distance. Other climbers have reported strange visual distortions due to oxygen deprivation, fatigue etc. For example, this excerpt from Minus 148… Read more »

damiengildea
Editor
2 months ago
Reply to  MuddyBoots

Yes, talk to any police officer. Eyewitness accounts are notoriously unreliable when you get into it. Add in altitude, dehydration, fatigue, grief, time etc and any report becomes even more unreliable.

+7
Max Madera
Max Madera
2 months ago
Reply to  damiengildea

Not to mention that, once a report is out (particularly if the source is credible), other witnesses tend to blend and conform their own perceptions to fit the story, so that it is very easy to have “similar” or confirming narratives when one version is known, or when the witnesses talk to each other before giving their own version. This creates a single reinforced story (the one that survives) that may be at odds with reality.

+6
Max Madera
Max Madera
2 months ago
Reply to  Max Madera

On the other hand, most people were climbing supported with O2, and some, like Tomaz Rotar, said that they virtually climbed up to the crevasse. So it is difficult to believe that they could be wrong on its location.

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Anna
2 months ago

Very sad. May they rest in pease.

+5
Walter Rott
Walter Rott
2 months ago

Very interesting report, objective and at the same time moving, sheds some more light on these sad episode, and confirms some of the assumptions that many of us already had; there were no falls, Serac breakouts or avalanches involved, an important clarified point.  The other aspect which is very likely ..is the approach this report makes on how things probably happened, the fact that one of these three brave men climbed up (maybe summiting) and descended faster.. and still it was not enough, which speaks volumes of how devastating the weather conditions were and also the circumstances “of all kinds” that… Read more »

Davey Dor
Davey Dor
2 months ago

.

+1
Last edited 2 months ago by Davey Dor
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Ganna Rozhnova
Ganna Rozhnova
2 months ago

I translated this article written by Valentyn in Russian. I see there are minor edits by Exporersweb, most of which are good but some aren’t. Most importantly, in the last version of the article’s text, Valentyn mentioned that he does not have contact details of the climber’s relatives (JP Mohr’s in the first place) but he hopes they could reach out to him. This sentence is gone.

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Last edited 2 months ago by Ganna Rozhnova
Pawel
Pawel
2 months ago
Reply to  Ganna Rozhnova

where is the original version in Russian? is it published somewhere?

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Dan
Dan
2 months ago

Did Sajid not leave a tent at Camp 4 with supplies?

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Elena
Elena
2 months ago
Reply to  Dan

Camp 4 was not there. They started their ascent from Camp 3. (Sajid was waiting for them there)

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Muzaffar Syed
Muzaffar Syed
2 months ago

Thanks for a detailed account of what you saw Valentyn. Rest in peace brave men, Sonori, Mohr and Ali, It will help the closure for the friends and family. The position of bodies and place of finding shows that they had summit the K2 in winter, a great achievement!! These three brave men have left this world, but their legacy will stay here for ever. Rest in peace.

+4
Bill Bones
2 months ago
Reply to  Muzaffar Syed

The Killer Mountain lives up to its name

+1
Shanda
Shanda
2 months ago
Reply to  Bill Bones

K2 is the “Savage Mountain”, Nanga Parbat is the “Killer Mountain”.

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Waimea8000
Waimea8000
1 month ago
Reply to  Shanda

TYVM for the clarification…seriously 👍. Not sure how many articles or videos are out there that botch this ! 🤔

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Armchair Coward
Armchair Coward
2 months ago

This is incredibly heart breaking and chilling at the same time. Thank you, Ganna for the translation work. I know translation word by word is incredibly difficult! Surprised to hear about Elia’s outrage (perhaps a strong word) but like someone else mentioned, it seems to me like Elia was too focused on making a documentary out of this tragedy (for whatever reasons). I know he has a wonderful charm on social media blah blah blah but you never know what a person’s real intentions are. But then again, anyone in the 8000m business these days are a bunch of ego-driven… Read more »

Ganna Rozhnova
Ganna Rozhnova
2 months ago

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Last edited 2 months ago by Ganna Rozhnova
GENREX
GENREX
2 months ago

You named yourself quite right. What a world it would be if everyone was a coward like you. No space exploration, no moon landing, no medical discoveries… Please sit on your armchair and refrain from commenting on things you have zero idea about.

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Bill Bones
2 months ago
Reply to  GENREX

He has as much right to reply as anybody else, and he raises perfectly valid points, what kind of a man would leave a wife and five young children to go and climb the Worlds most deadly mountain in Winter?
This isn’t the action of a Hero, in fact its quite the opposite!
Now please stop fawning and know the Truth!

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Gaby
Gaby
21 days ago
Reply to  Bill Bones

My sentiment exactly, bill BonesI really think Snorri was the weak link here in this climb. He got entangled in his lines, could not free himself…poor Ali was waiting for him and froze to death too. Snorri leaves 6 children, not 5—2 of them are toddlers, 2 of them young teens, the other 2 are adults. Very selfish pursuit on Snorri’s side, leaving all these kids without father. Not a very heroic undertaking. If you want to engage in dangerous pursuits like winter climbing K2 (with horrible death statistics), then please do not have kids!

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Last edited 21 days ago by Gaby
Luís Nogueira
Luís Nogueira
2 months ago

Don’t say that, these people live on another level. We may not understand but we do respect them. Be kind.

+4
Bill Bones
2 months ago

Im inclined to agree with every word of what you wrote, its the epitome of egoity

+1
Gaby
Gaby
21 days ago

6 kids, not 5

0
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Ganna Rozhnova
Ganna Rozhnova
2 months ago

I would like to ask the readers a few questions. Why does Elia Saikaly not tag Sajid Ali Sadpara (the son of Ali Sadpara) in his latest Instagram posts? A good example is the photo with the flag of Pakistan identifying the place where Sajid buried his father. Btw, Sajid does not tag Elia either. To which extent are they a team? Why does Elia not mention on Instagram important facts like that Hugo Ayaviri helped Sajid to bring his father’s body down to Camp 4? Sajid refers to Hugo as to “an angel” in his post. What is the… Read more »

Tara
Tara
2 months ago
Reply to  Ganna Rozhnova

This is exactly why his detailed and unbiased report is so important. And also your translation and further comments! Thank you.

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Ganna Rozhnova
Ganna Rozhnova
2 months ago
Reply to  Tara

No problem! We can only hope that this tragedy will teach us something.

+2
Elena
Elena
2 months ago
Reply to  Ganna Rozhnova

Ganna! Many thanks to you and Valentin for the accurate, tactfully presented information!

+2
Jake
Jake
2 months ago
Reply to  Ganna Rozhnova

Hi Ganna, thanks for the translation! I don’t want to speculate on the relationship between Sajid and Elia, because I have never met either of them and I have no idea what goes on behind the screen of Instagram or social medias. However, regarding the J.P. backpack question my theory is that he may have turned back from the summit attempt before Ali and John, due to the conditions/weather/physical well-being, which in my mind explains why he was below the bottle neck and almost to the C4 location, while the others were still pretty high up. He may have abandoned… Read more »

Walter Rott
Walter Rott
2 months ago
Reply to  Jake

It is highly unlikely that JP turned back from the summit push before John Snorry and Ali, because two clear reasons: JP was arguably the strongest of the three climbers and the fittest for the summit attempt, he was adapted to not using 02, never used oxygen in his 8000ers summits , a natural non 02 climber, ..while both JS and AS had planned to do it on 02, and due to circumstances they no longer had it available, they were not natural non O2 climbers, especially JS, … the lack of oxygen undoubtedly harmed them more , with no… Read more »

MuddyBoots
MuddyBoots
2 months ago
Reply to  Walter Rott

Much of what you are saying makes good sense. But people have turned back even closer to the summit…the first name that comes to mind is Fritz Weissner. For example, if the weather got really bad, or he started experiencing frostbite, JP might have been the first to turn back, because he is super-experienced and didn’t appear obsessed. I think JP, more than anyone, knew that if he was alive he could try again. Poor Ali had the weight of a whole country’s expectations on his back, AND he was in the employ of John Snorri, so obligated to support… Read more »

Walter Rott
Walter Rott
2 months ago
Reply to  MuddyBoots

Im fully aware about the commercial bond between John and Ali and the obligations that arise from it, especially when it comes to Ali, an integral person, a great mountain professional and a man who deeply felt his own homeland, I have a lot of respect for that. To the point; Freezing occurs absolutely earlier in those less accustomed to not using O2, not the opposite, not in those physically more adapted and accustomed to not using it…so, who was most physically affected by the climb in first instance? what is most likely to have happened?  I strongly intuit that… Read more »

Last edited 2 months ago by Walter Rott
Khizer
Khizer
2 months ago
Reply to  Walter Rott

Why do you repeatedly keep spreading these false and completely inaccurate claims? What is your agenda here? I’ve corrected you before yet you keep lying through your teeth. Ali Sadpara has 12 successful summits on 8000ers, the first ever winter summit on Nangaparbat, and multiple winter attempts on 8000ers all without O2. He was a bona fide non O2 climber. Nor were they ever planning to climb Winter K2 with O2, they had 1 bottle of O2 for emergencies. Why do you keep spreading your lies that he was “not a natural non O2 climber”? What is wrong with you?… Read more »

Walter Rott
Walter Rott
2 months ago
Reply to  Khizer

Here it is not about preconceived agendas or about highlighting figures for the mere fact of doing so, or undermining others, but about doing an exercise to understand the events as they happened … and in that context be objective with the information that is available from that winter K2 . I had not even noticed you, but now that I read you I see that you have felt touched in some way, that is actually ridiculous indeed … well, things are as they are, I’m sorry for your susceptibility.   It is a known fact that John Snorri and Ali… Read more »

Khizer
Khizer
2 months ago
Reply to  Walter Rott

I’m sorry but you are talking nonsense again, this is not the youtube comment section. You presenting fantastical theories to support a singular agenda and then backing them up with blatantly false statements is shameful. But every sport has it’s toxic tourist fanboys, why not climbing? Like I said, I don’t care if you want to make JP into more than what he was. Not that he ever needed you to, he was a great climber and a great guy. My problem is your repeated lies, willful or otherwise, against Sadpara who was unanimously considered as one of the best… Read more »

Walter Rott
Walter Rott
2 months ago
Reply to  Khizer

Mad boy removing and adding positives, lol, oh well….you are joke .

Hopefully this whole sad winter K2 episode will be clarified as much as possible in a way close to what really happened, that is what is important and what truly brings respect to everyone and dignifies everything.

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Last edited 2 months ago by Walter Rott
Khizer
Khizer
2 months ago
Reply to  Walter Rott

Huh? Removing and adding positives? What?

Anyway…so nothing to back your claims? Nothing to show how/why Sadpara couldn’t climb without O2? Not even a list of his climbs with O2? Or something to show that his winter attempt was an O2 attempt? Pretty sure you can fabricate some more claims on the spot.

+5
Pawel
Pawel
2 months ago
Reply to  Khizer

Sajid Sadpara said that when he was leaving they at Bottleneck, both Ali and John were using O2, I think it is good enough reason to claim that they were climbing with O2. And Sajid Sadpara abandoned the summit push because of malfunction of own O2 mask. Why do you think that Ali was climbing without O2???

+7
Walter Rott
Walter Rott
2 months ago
Reply to  Pawel

Let it go, the boy is obviously still busy hitting +/- icons “thumbs up” here and there and such lol (pathetic certainly). It is not the idea to undermine anyone but mainly to be realistic with what could happen, that’s it.
 Adding to what you have said; Tomaz Rotar, the Slovenian climber who besides Sajid was the last to have contact with John Snorri and Ali also points out the use of O2 by both climbers in that summit push day (JS, and AS). In general it is a known fact, no need to keep redundant…or going further more.

+9
Khizer
Khizer
2 months ago
Reply to  Walter Rott

Well my friend, along with climbing you don’t know how the “+/- icons thumbs up” work either. Can you please stop these pathetic lies. This is the direct quote from Tomaz Rotar, “As I proceeded down, I met Ali Sadpara and sometime later, Juan Pablo [Mohr], without O2.” Btw, this quote also destroys your nonsensical theories of JP being super human, overtaking Snorri and Sadpara, sumitting by himself, and then descending alone. That too while not using O2 when, by your false claims, the other two were. PS: I don’t care about the ad hominem you’ve tried to use. If… Read more »

Last edited 2 months ago by Khizer
Walter Rott
Walter Rott
2 months ago
Reply to  Khizer

That detail in Rotar’s story is clearly stating a starting order in which the climbers left from C3, that is the correct way to interpret it,… later, according to Rotar himself “everyone” came to gather together around the infamous Crevasse and there they were for a while (JS, JP, AS, Sajid and Tomaz Rotar). In this case, the slowest started from C3 first, Snorri was the first to leave C3, moving very slowly but determined (according to Rotar himself) with several minutes/even hours between each climber, then Sadpara left and so on. ..Mohor was the last to leave C3 (and… Read more »

Last edited 2 months ago by Walter Rott
Robert
Robert
2 months ago
Reply to  Walter Rott

Let’s not make too many assumptions on who decended faster on this particular climb. We won’t know just by the positions of the climbers. We can’t assume it was speed on decending of JP’s location, or Ali’s. They all could of been decending together or in another order, and when the others succumbed to the strong winds and cold, he could of just outlasted the cold longer to make it that farther down. There are many possibilities. Any one of them could of spent time trying to help the unlucky predicament of the other and when it was impossible and… Read more »

Last edited 2 months ago by Robert
Walter Rott
Walter Rott
2 months ago
Reply to  Khizer

Once again, It is not about creating caricatures of climbers, like super humans or childish stuff like that, not at all;… If a climber has an /official/ record of having climbed linking Lhotse and then Everest without O2 and without Sherpas support in less than a week (the previous record was of Anatoli Boukreev, there’s even a documentary about Mohr’sachievement ) it speaks a lot of a strong and also very f-a-s-t climber, no one has done it faster and without supplementary oxygen to date (just a matter of researching a little) … even doing a little further research we… Read more »

Rebe
Rebe
2 months ago
Reply to  Khizer

What are you from my goodness!!??? A hero lover than cannot see further than his hero love. You sound like a fanatic I’m afraid. I didn’t know anything about these three mountaineers before January 2021 and I can assure you that I have read everything that has been published. To my understanding, Ali and JS were climbing with O2. It doesn’t matter how many times Ali has done it without O2 before because those other climbs without O2 didn’t acclimate him for his last climb. JP was acclimated and strong. He left last and catched the other two as Sajid… Read more »

Last edited 2 months ago by Becaby
Khizer
Khizer
2 months ago
Reply to  Rebe

Dear Walter Rott, please do not post under multiple fake names. We can see through it, your sentence structure gives it away.

0
Helen
Helen
2 months ago
Reply to  Pawel

I have not seen this clame about Snorri and Ali using the oxigen. In interviews with Snorri the plan was to go without oxigen but they had some for emergencies. https://www.bbc.com/news/world-asia-56022457 Now, we don’t know anything about the findings on John Snorri and Ali Sadpara. And it looks like Snorris Thuraya SAT phone is missing (the one that had a signal at 7pm on the 5th.) And no backpack was on JP Mohr, we also have no info about his Inmarsat phone. I never understood why Sajid said they had no connection, JP Mohr last inreach signal was normal then… Read more »

Last edited 2 months ago by Helen
Khizer
Khizer
2 months ago
Reply to  Pawel

Please provide anything to support that Sajid ever stated that. I’d be happy to correct myself. In his interviews he has clearly stated “I was climbing without oxygen and at 8200 I realized that I was not feeling well due to the lack of oxygen. I was carrying that ONE O2 bottle for emergency so my father told me to use it and come along. But when I tried to use it it leaked and so I came back down.” https://youtu.be/kmwQLpKiGsw Then in another interview. “We had carried AN oxygen cylinder in our emergency gear. My father told me to… Read more »

Rebe
Rebe
1 month ago
Reply to  Khizer

https://exweb.gearjunkie.com/2021/02/24/k2-sajid-sadparas-story/ “Snorri, the slowest in the team, left at 11:30 pm. Ali, always fast on the mountains, followed at 2 am. Both used supplementary O2 — each carried two bottles.” And if you read the comments: Moirah Ahmad 6 months ago Reply to Don Paul I claimed so because he was climbing with O2, it’s not a secret. Both John and Ali were using from C3. Which I can’t see the issue in that, or people’s resistance to it, because at the end of the day O2 or not it doesn’t matter. Here is your proof!!!!!!! You have a very… Read more »

Last edited 1 month ago by Becaby
Bill Bones
2 months ago
Reply to  Khizer

Well said bro, he’s a complete fantasist!
There’s no merit in anything he says

0
Maria Elena
Maria Elena
2 months ago
Reply to  Walter Rott

It is not so like that … Juan Pablo was very aware of not losing his objectivity, he even hesitated to leave with them when he heard them say “the summit or death” at C3. He believed that the most important thing was to return home whith his children.

+4
MuddyBoots
MuddyBoots
2 months ago
Reply to  Maria Elena

Maria Elena, I thought I had read everything about this, but your comment about JPs mindset is new. I think this highlights the fact that some of the evidence may actually come from those who stayed at camp 3, but were part of the conversations (or overheard) discussions of plans, tactics, or even random comments. Thank you!

+1
Bill Bones
2 months ago
Reply to  Walter Rott

Rubbish, Sadpara was by far the strongest climber of the three

0
Elena
Elena
2 months ago
Reply to  Ganna Rozhnova

Elia and Sajid are a team, but with different interests. As far as I understood, the expedition was organized and financed by Elia in order to complete his film. He invited Sajid, since he needed the Main Hero. Sajid had no options! Without financial support, he would not have been able to find and bury his father! As strange as it may sound, Elia, as an author, decides who to mention in the film and who not. Alas.. The result of this teamwork satisfied everyone. Sajid buried his father. (I hope now his mental wound will stop hurting) .. Elia… Read more »

Walter Rott
Walter Rott
2 months ago
Reply to  Ganna Rozhnova

You have highlighted important points on here; It is precisely against the lack of information or omissions where this report by Valentyn Sypavin comes to fill the gap in that sense…and also leaves the questions exposed. About JP’s belongings, backpack, gadgets, etc.. I wonder the same. JP also had an Inreach, Gopro and a mobile phone, and as Valentyn Sypavin’s report confirms the general consensus among experts and climbers that it was all due to exposure and exhaustion, with no falls or avalanches involved here, which obviously would have been the cause of camera loss and other stuff, but it was not… Read more »

Sanya
Sanya
2 months ago
Reply to  Walter Rott

From Sadjid’s twitter:

@imranhthaheem please don’t misrepresent or make false accusations. If you are a fan of my father than please don’t spread confusion. Elia is a great friend and he is the reason behind all things we managed so far. Allah has been very kind on us all in finding the fallen heroes.

Can you all stop with accusations and conspiracy theories now?

+5
Walter Rott
Walter Rott
2 months ago
Reply to  Sanya

I was referring mainly to JP’s devices, especially his camera, which is vital to further clarify what happened and how.

+6
Sanya
Sanya
2 months ago
Reply to  Walter Rott

Hi Walter, sorry I meant to reply to Ganna.

+3
Walter Rott
Walter Rott
2 months ago
Reply to  Sanya

Ok, hi, np.

+3
Ganna Rozhnova
Ganna Rozhnova
2 months ago
Reply to  Sanya

I don’t really have any theories. I understand the son Sajid who is grateful because he got his chance to return to the mountain and bury his father. I understand the filmmaker and storyteller Elia who is doing his job. In addition, this project turned out somewhat personal to him because this tragedy happened during his previous assignment but he survived. I look forward to his film to see what kind of story he presents us with. Without such stories, we would know even less.

+5
Ganna Rozhnova
Ganna Rozhnova
2 months ago
Reply to  Walter Rott

They recovered some of J.P.’s personal belongings for his family but they did not specify what exactly. GoPro was not explicitly mentioned.

+3
MuddyBoots
MuddyBoots
2 months ago
Reply to  Ganna Rozhnova

Thank you so much for the important translation. I think Valentyn’s report was careful and helpful, but there is only preliminary info, nothing is final yet. I think we are a “now, now, now, I want it now, I want answers right now!” culture, and subjecting Sajid, Elia, the Sadpara, Snorri and Mohr families to those demands is really sad and unfortunate. We don’t have a right to this private info about the last hours of their loved ones, we didn’t mortgage our house and take out loans to finance this search, and we didn’t put our lives on the… Read more »

Tara
Tara
2 months ago
Reply to  MuddyBoots

I agree that we have to be patient, avoid speculation and let the story reveal itself in it’s own timing. The hard part here is privacy and the truth. The moment a filmmaker steps in with the intention to make a film (documentary) for general public, then privacy is irreversibly corrupted from the first shot, even before the film is out in cinemas. Everyone involved should be well aware of this simple (and sometimes cruel) fact. Another problem so well exposed in Ganna’s comments and questions is how the tragic sequence of events will be presented, who will be included… Read more »

Ganna Rozhnova
Ganna Rozhnova
2 months ago
Reply to  MuddyBoots

I was lucky enough not to be a participant of “several ridiculous rounds of speculation/rumor/conspiracy theories based on wild speculation” 🙂 As many people who climb I followed the winter news from K2 but not more than that. It just happened that I know Valentyn and offered to translate his wonderful blogs from his recent ascent of K2 and multiple Everest expeditions and he suggested that this report was more worth translating. The saddest thing of all for me is that John’s body is still hanging on the route. I hope his family will find a way to bury him.… Read more »

MuddyBoots
MuddyBoots
2 months ago
Reply to  Ganna Rozhnova

Again, thanks so much Ganna! Valentyn’s posts have been wonderful, please tell him how much readers here appreciate his skills and his mountain ethics, As well as his “tell it like it is” reports. But so much better to read your translations than to run his through translating apps.

+2
Mina Moroz
2 months ago
Reply to  MuddyBoots

А я включаю дважды перевод)))) обратно на русский)))

0
Tara
Tara
2 months ago
Reply to  Mina Moroz

😄

0
Ganna Rozhnova
Ganna Rozhnova
2 months ago
Reply to  MuddyBoots

If you are on Facebook, you can comment directly under Valentyn’s repost 😉

0
Rajashahid
Rajashahid
2 months ago

Thanks for ur post. L

+1
trackback

[…] und Sadpara waren definitiv im Abstieg. Es gab keine Abstürze“, resümiert der Ukrainer auf ExplorersWeb. „Sie starteten zu ihrem Gipfelvorstoß von Lager 3 (7.330 m!) aus. Ich glaube, wenn es in […]

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trackback

[…] froze to death. “Snorri and Sadpara were definitely descending. There were no falls,” the Ukrainian summed up on ExplorersWeb. “They started the summit push from C3 (7,330m!). I think that if there had been a tent in […]

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anonymous
anonymous
2 months ago

a

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trackback

[…] el medio Explorers Web, Sypavin contó lo que […]

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Susana Cabezas
Susana Cabezas
2 months ago

Deberían traer los cuerpos y entregárselo a las respectivas familias, por algo la montaña los devolvió, para que sus familias puedan vivir el duelo como corresponde .
Las autoridades o las empresas que apoyaban a estos deportistas, deberían gestionar la entrega de los cuerpos.
🙏

+2
Last edited 2 months ago by Susana Cabezas
Rodrigo
Rodrigo
2 months ago
Reply to  Susana Cabezas

From what I understand the families of Jp and Ali have defined leaving the bodies in the mountain both were buried under the snow and removed from the main route. The Snorri case seems sadder since if he doesn’t misunderstand he still hangs out. What a great tragedy.

+3
Mila
Mila
2 months ago
Reply to  Rodrigo

i asked Elia Saikaly a couple of times about this and no answer. Noone ever mentioned about Snorri’s body and if they manage to cover it somehow…

+2
Rodrigo
Rodrigo
2 months ago
Reply to  Mila

Thanks for the clarification, I had seemed to have read it in some post I do not remember which of all.

0
Bill Bones
2 months ago
Reply to  Rodrigo

Surely someone could cut him free and push his body over the side

0
maritz
maritz
2 months ago

que triste y extraño no entiendo de montañas ni nieve, pero porqué bajó antes uno solo y se separó de los tres?. El fue el ultimo que los vió con vida, y no se que cuenta él. Ojalá se investigue bien y no quede en las conjeturas que se congelaron, que se revise toda evidencia.

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Juan
Juan
2 months ago
Reply to  maritz

I am really sad for them and your families. Neither really know what happened. They probably make a mistake that cause finally your decease.
The people that have this way of live know that your lifes always are in danger.

+1
Riaz Ahmad
Riaz Ahmad
2 months ago

Thanks for sharing.still nobody knows what’s happen with them.

+1
tayyab siddiqui
tayyab siddiqui
2 months ago

It is very sad heart touching to know about this. Yes, I was waiting anxiously for the reasons news about the 3 bodies. Clearly, they made the summit and died during the descend. But still waiting for the close pictures and videos.

0
trackback

[…] a los alpinistas fue el guía y montañista Valentyn Sypavin, quien compartió en el medio Explorers Web el relato del momento en que logró hallar a estas […]

0
trackback

[…] hallar a los alpinistas fue el guía y montañista Valentyn Sypavin, quien compartió en el medio Explorers Web el relato del momento en que descubrió el paradero de estas […]

0
trackback

[…] distintas ubicaciones. El ucraniano Valentyn Sypavin halló a Mohr en la cima del K2. En el sitio Explorers Web, el europeo entregó todos los detalles cuando encontró los restos del […]

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trackback

[…] Valentyn Sypavin, quien en entrevista exclusiva con el sitio especializado en deportes extremos http://www.explorersweb.com, entregó la cronología completa del pasado 26 de julio, día en que pudo encontrar el cuerpo del […]

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trackback

[…] me gustaría compartir mis hallazgos de primera fuente”, comentó en el sitio especializado ExplorersWeb y según recoge La […]

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Bill Bones
2 months ago

I have been proved spectacularly wrong, it was my belief they were lost forever due to icefall at the Cerac
RIP

0
Muskrat
2 months ago

Rip to all and many prayers to all families

0
imran khalid
imran khalid
2 months ago

That was really a tragic day on K2 for the whole community of mountaineers and for the whole world. May their should Rest In Peace.

0
Alex Godynyuk
Alex Godynyuk
19 days ago

I believe Snorri summited.. He was not the weak link. I am headed to Pakistan in December to become the second White person to summit K2 in winter

0
babajoon
babajoon
16 days ago

Mingma G & his cohorts who had supposedly summited K2 earlier. are the the ones who cut the fix ropes they had installed earlier and sending Ali Sadpara and his two companions to their death.The hasty pictures Mingma G took of his team”s summiting K2 says it all.The true number of the climbers on K2 as can be seen in the pictures remains a riddle……two or three were sent to cut the fixed ropes as fast as they could.

0
Steven Wilde
Steven Wilde
9 days ago

the ropes were cut… Snorri and Ali made it to the top!

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