ExWeb’s Adventure Links of The Week

When we’re not outdoors, we get our adventure fix by exploring social media and the web. Sometimes we’re a little too plugged in and browsing adventure reads can turn from minutes to hours. To nourish your own adventure fix, here are some of the best adventure links we’ve discovered this week.

100 Years After The First Ascent of the World’s Northernmost Active Volcano, This Team Climbed it Again: A research team set sail from Svalbard for remote Jan Mayen land to retrace the steps of British scientist James Wordie. Their expedition would be part tribute, part adventure, and part examination of the world’s fastest-changing environment.

At a Wilderness Resort in Canada, Getting There Is the Only Hard Part: No roads lead to Shadow Lake Lodge, in the backcountry near Banff. Reaching it requires a 12km hike. The payoff: solitude, adventure, and ease. The story however fails to mention, however, the fierce and plucky spruce grouse that visitors often encounter on the trail into the lodge.

Photo: Steph Davis

No rope, no problem

Free Soloing Means No Rope. These Climbers Have Defined the Pursuit: Free soloing, a genre that first verged into the American consciousness in the 1970s. In 2018, it blew up, with Alex Honnold’s mind-bending solo of El Capitan and the award-winning film that chronicled it. Let’s take a look back.

Why the North Pole Matters: An Important History of Challenges and Global Fascination: In this essay, noted geologist and geophysicist Fred Roots explores the significance of the symbolic point at the top of the world. He submitted it to Canadian Geographic magazine just before his death in October 2016 at age 93.

 

“Not a chair in sight — I had to sit on the grass, and was left with an unsightly wet patch so it looked like I had soiled myself.”

 

“Too High and Totally Undeveloped”- Classic Tripadvisor Summit Reviews: Daft online reviews occasionally make it into the mainstream media, and they don’t get much sillier than complaints about mountains. UK Hillwalking has mined Tripadvisor for some classic summit reviews of British mountains.

An Explorer Confronts His Last Canyon: After a lifetime plumbing the slots and arroyos of the Southwest, adventure writer David Roberts finds himself face to face with mysteries past and present. Roberts — who passed away last summer — had dedicated years to exploring and writing about the cave dwellings of the Anasazi, a prehistoric Native American civilization.

Anasazi Cliff Palace ruins at Mesa Verde, Colorado. Photo: Shutterstock

Ash Routen is a Writer for ExplorersWeb. He has been writing about Arctic travel, Mountaineering, Science, Camping, Hiking, Outdoor Gear for 5 years. As well as ExplorersWeb, he has written for Red Bull, Outside, The Guardian and many other outlets. Based in Leicester, UK, Routen is an avid hiker, camper, and arctic traveller who writes about the outdoors around a full time job as an academic.

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