Peter Hamor Eyes Kangchenjunga Traverse

Kangchenjunga, at 8,586m the world’s third-highest peak, is not enough for Peter Hamor. Yesterday, the Slovakian Mountaineering Association, SHS JAMES, announced that Hamor will try to traverse from Yalung Kang (8,505m) to Kangchenjunga’s main summit, with Romanian partners Horia Colibasanu and Marius Gane.

The news came as a surprise to everyone, including Colibasanu and Gane. Colibasanu, still at home in Romania, first learned of it from the news. “We had discussed some ideas, but I was not aware anything was fixed,” he told ExplorersWeb.

Colibasanu added: “Peter is already in Nepal, looking at Yalung Kang climbing permits and details. The traverse is indeed an exciting idea, but only feasible if the mountain’s normal route (which the team would use to descend) is in good condition.”

The planned traverse from Kangchenjunga’s BC to Yalung Kang, the massif’s main summit, and back down the normal route. Topo: SHS JAMES

 

In addition, the Romanian climber remarked that the Yalung Kang traverse would be done as a second climb, after summiting Kangchenjunga via its normal route. The route map shared by SHS JAMES shows the traverse from Yalung Kang to Kangchenjunga’s main summit. But if it is a secondary climb, it is not clear whether the three might eventually decide to change directions and head for Yalung Kang from the top of Kangchenjunga.

Other uncertainties

The expedition faces uncertainty in areas other than climbing. Colibasanu previously told ExWeb that his plans depended on the situation in neighboring Ukraine. At present, the Romanians have plane tickets for April 5. “However, we are still watching the situation on our border carefully…Our second largest town is just 300km from Odessa,” Colibasanu said.

Hamor previously completed all 14 of the 8,000m peaks without supplementary O2, including Kangchenjunga in 2012. On the other hand, Colibasanu and Gane would become the first Romanians to summit Kangchenjunga.

The highly experienced trio has done several high-altitude, no-O2 ascents. In 2019 and 2021, they attempted the still-unclimbed NW Ridge of Dhaulagiri.

Angela Benavides is a journalist specialised on high-altitude mountaineer and expedition news working with ExplorersWeb.com.

Angela Benavides has been writing about climbing and mountaineering, adventure and outdoor sports for 20+ years.

Prior to that, Angela Benavides spent time at/worked at a number of national and international media. She is also experienced in outdoor-sport consultancy for sponsoring corporates, press manager and communication executive, radio reporter and anchorwoman, etc. Experience in Education: Researcher at Spain’s National University for Distance Learning on the European Commission-funded ECO Learning Project; experience in teaching ELE (Spanish as a Second Language) and transcultural training for expats living in Spain.

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Tony Hackett
Tony Hackett
3 months ago

That Kangchenjunga traverse sounds like a great challenge and I hope they can pull it off. For now, I’m focused on completing the volcanic seven summits. Hoping to climb Ojos del Salado next year as my final peak. But after doing that. I have my own ideas for a traverse. Everest and Lhotse in winter. These two peaks have been traverse several times in summer. Sometimes, in a single day. But, nobody has done it in winter. I’m considering giving it a try perhaps in the winter of 2025. I also think it would be nice to experience Everest as… Read more »

damiengildea
3 months ago
Reply to  Tony Hackett

Tony, Everest and Lhotse have never been traversed. They have been climbed in quick succession only. Traditionally in climbing terms a traverse needs to go across the peak, ie. up one way and down another. The ascents of Everest and Lhotse have been up/down the normal route on each peak, usually with a descent to C3 or C2 in between. A true traverse of Everest and Lhotse has of course been talked about a lot but never truly attempted. The most obvious and natural line would be up the west ridge of Everest, down the SE ridge to the South… Read more »

Jaroslav Flidr
Jaroslav Flidr
3 months ago

Hamor climb Everest with supplementary O2.