Summits on Annapurna

8000ers Annapurna
The route on Annapurna. Photo: Antonio Sykaris

After yesterday’s failed attempt due to insufficient rope to fix the route above 7,400m, climbers on Annapurna have finally reached the summit on their second try.

At 12:20pm, Viridiana Alvared texted that she was on top through her Garmin device (although her tracker located her 50 metres lower). Dawa Sherpa confirmed the summits from Base Camp 15 minutes later but has not yet provided any names.

The Pakistani team’s tracker located them at the same height as Alvared. The Indian team was 100m lower.

The Summit Push

According to Antonios Sykaris’ home team, the climbers were delayed by some 40cm of fresh snow. The Pakistani climbers had also mentioned snowfall and thunderstorms the day before.

At 9am Nepal time, expedition leader Dawa Sherpa reported that the entire team was on the final couloir to the summit and that summits were expected in one to two hours. In fact, the push took longer.

Viridiana Alvarez’s tracker located her at 7,900m at 12:15, Nepal time.

Juan Oiarzabal told ExplorersWeb yesterday that the final couloir was the only point above Camp 4 where ropes have always been fixed. This year, expedition managers have pitched Camp 4 lower down the route, and divided the tents into lower (at 6,800m) and higher (7,000m) sections.

After the couloir, climbers must navigate Annapurna’s summit ridge in order to find the actual highest point. In the past, finding the summit has been a confusing task due to several outcrops, but this has been cleared up by research completed by 8000ers.com over several years.

Annapurna’s summit ridge with all the key points marked. The topographical summits are C2 (C for Cornice) and C3, although C1 is barely 8m lower and the altitude depends on the cornice’s current shape. Photo: 8000ers.com

After several days at altitude, two of them at higher Camp 4, climbers now have a long trudge back.  Further details, about conditions found on the mountain, the climbers’ physical well-being, use of O2, and the logistical issues, are expected as climbers return to Base Camp.

Exhausted, climbers may not reach Base Camp today, preferring instead to rest before tackling the dangerous descent between Camp 3 and Camp 2.

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About the Author

Angela Benavides

Angela Benavides

Senior journalist, published author and communication consultant. Specialized on high-altitude mountaineering, with an interest for everything around the mountains: from economics to geopolitics. After five years exploring distant professional ranges, I returned to ExWeb BC in 2018. Feeling right at home since then!

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Tenzin
Tenzin
7 months ago

All tourist-bashing aside – big congrats to all those who summited! Annapurna is not easy. Hope everyone has a safe downclimb to base camp and let the feeling sink in.

Hope they have collected enough photos for their insipirational and motivational social media posts.

+2
daniela
Daniela Teixeira
7 months ago

So…any summits? Not even with trackers and loads of info. they can step on the highest point? The title of the article does not seem to correspond to its content, it should be “Summits” on Annapurna? Anew age of alpinism is being born! An age of unprepared rope jumaring people, unaclimatised sucking oxigen and close to summit elite alpinist, helicopter transports to base camp, and helicopters taking ropes and food and…whatever more to high altitude 😅! This is progress!

+5
daniela
Daniela Teixeira
7 months ago

I already climbed an 8000 without oxigen and porters, using a jumar and trail, and failed on another choosing a different route than the normal route. So I know precisely the difference of difficulties. I also climbed some virgin 6000m mountains, so I am able to evaluate the difference in difficulties…and you, can you tell the difference? And yes, I feel sad to see the course alpinism in is taking in this big mountains with all the helps and lies, all of these go against the spirit of REAL alpinism. And also, I consider the summit the highest point, not… Read more »

Sachiko
Sachiko
7 months ago

I thought a true alpinist and outdoor-enthusiast is a humble person, but you seem first to pour out ugly talk diminishing others including the author of this article and then start to brag about how awesome you are. Brrr… get a little more humble and maybe people on the internet will consider your achievements worth something and continue the discussion with you.

+1
Last edited 7 months ago by Sachiko
Rodrigo Granzotto Peron
Rodrigo Granzotto Peron
7 months ago

Queridíssima Daniela, the Himalayan Times is even more cryptic, saying “the climbers touched the final couloir” (so, no summit?) and “at least 44 climbers including seven Nepali women representing four teams have already reached the high camps of Mt Annapurna” (high camps? final couloir?). Here goes one more chaos to identify who summited…

Um abraço do Brasil

+1
Damien François
Damien François
7 months ago

BRAVO!

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Khadija R
Khadija R
7 months ago

Congratulations to all those who made it to the summit. This is one big feat. Hope for their safe descent.

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Terri
Terri
7 months ago

HUGE! Congrats everyone for summiting.

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christine wierbietzki
christine wierbietzki
7 months ago

better the chopper delivers rope than body bags… think about it!

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F v
F v
7 months ago

Trackers now showing the route to the summit with 8091 m height. So they made it! They now back at C4, hope for a safe decent of all tomorrow with increasing wind.

+1
MuddyBoots
MuddyBoots
7 months ago

The climbers were very VERY lucky. When a logistical fail (not enough rope) caused an extra day in Camp 4, the weather was good enough for a helicopter to fly and drop supplies. What if the snowfall, or a bigger storm, started earlier or lasted longer and a flight was impossible? If unacclimatized and O2 dependent climbers planning only for a short, fast climb ran out of gas, it would have been a real crisis. In this case, the weather was congenial and allowed the groups to summit. Hoping their descent is safe and all arrive at BC. Angela’s previous… Read more »

MuddyBoots
MuddyBoots
7 months ago

Also noted that the small Indian team coordinated the helicopter drop, according to Exweb reports. That might be an interesting story in itself.

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Bob
Bob
7 months ago

Is this still considered to be “mountaineering”?

+3
J Sparky
J Sparky
7 months ago
Reply to  Bob

Next year they’re going to chopper in some escalators at the couloirs and put in oxygen & espresso stations between the camps

+2
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