Russians Reach Crux on Jannu

Climbing Mountain
The orange line shows the originally intended route. Nilov and Golovchenko have now deviated left, red line, to avoid the highly difficult headwall. They're aiming to hit the Southeast Ridge and follow that to the summit instead. Photo: RussianClimb

Sergey Nilov and Dimitry Golovchenko have now passed 7,000m on Mount Jannu and are at the crux of their climb. Since they have determined that the headwall is too difficult, they plan to traverse to the Southeast Ridge, from which the route becomes slightly easier. The Southeast Ridge was Lionel Terray’s original 1962 ascent route on this rarely climbed peak.

Based on a GPS tracker, the Russians’ current altitude is around 7,200m. They have another 500m to the summit.

“We are OK, searched long for a tent site,” the pair told their support team late Friday night. On March 24, Sunday evening, their Base Camp team spotted a light on the wall.

Marcin Tomaszewski, who withdrew from the climb last week and has been evacuated from Base Camp to Kathmandu with an infected leg, said: “[They] are trying to get through the barrier to the ridge…We all keep our fingers crossed.”

If successful, Nilov and Golovchenko will have to descend the opposite side of the mountain, not returning to their original Base Camp.

Related stories:

Mount Jannu: Why is It So Hard?

Russians Move Slowly Up Jannu

About the Author

Ash Routen

Ash Routen

Ash is a full-time PhD Exercise Scientist from the UK. Outside of work Ash is an outdoor and adventure writer who has written for Rock and Ice, Outside, Red Bull, The Telegraph, Financial Times, UK Climbing etc. In 2018 he led a 640km foot crossing of a frozen Lake Baikal in Siberia.

See more at www.ashrouten.com.

You can support Ash's ambition of becoming a full time writer at www.patreon.com/ashrouten

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