Mingma G Answers K2 Summit Questions

K2 Winter 8000ers
Mingma G
Mingma G on K2 some weeks ago. Frame from a video on Mingma G's FB

It’s been a busy month for all the Nepali summiters of K2, but team leader Mingma Gyalje (aka Mingma G) caught up with ExplorersWeb between flights, to clear up some of the questions about this historical climb. He succinctly puts to rest the controversy around any “cut” ropes, since no one can speak with more authority: He was the last to rappel down during their descent from the summit.

Mingma also details the summit moment, when all the Nepalis took the last few steps together. Several commenters have pointed out that only eight climbers can be seen in the video of their arrival, while others (including ExplorersWeb) wondered about the lack of a group summit photo, which would surely have become iconic.

Here is what Mingma G has to say:

“I think there are three shots in the video where you can actually see 10 people. Bear in mind that we are at 8,611m, where every step takes a few seconds, and we are not exactly in line. Some are a bit behind, but we are in a row.”

Photos 1 to 3: Frames from the Nepali summit video, with names marked in black by Mingma G

“We can see: Dawa Temba in yellow, Nims [Nirmal Purja] in red without O2 mask, Mingma Tenzi in light yellow, Mingma David in black a little behind me, myself in red with a red hat, and Kili on the far left. The last one, holding the Nepalese flag, is Gelje.” [Check the other pictures marked by Mingma G to locate Sona, Pem Chhiri, and Dawa Tenjin.]

“[On] reaching the summit, everyone started taking pictures for their own sponsors, with their banners and the Nepali flag. At some point, Nims started down, nobody really noticed when, and we all followed. Nims just has only one picture of the summit, I guess. The reason is, we got really late to the summit and winds were picking [up], so we had no time to take group pictures.”

As Mingma G, Kili Pemba, and Dawa Tenjin took their summit pics for sponsors, other climbers (in the back) started moving down. Photo: Courtesy of Mingma G

“You can find all 10 Sherpas in the video. Except for Dawa Tenjin, Kili, and myself, all the down suits were different and you can easily figure out how many persons there are in total.”

Ropes above Camp 4

About the overblown rope issue, Mingma says ironically: “Of course, reaching the summit at sunset and in increasing wind, at such a crucial time, our only thought was to cut ropes — that’s an awesome calculation! … Lower down, on steep ice, fighting exhaustion and at -50ºC – do you think we would have made it back safely if we had tried to cut ropes?”

This rumor had been given wings by famous Pakistani climber Nazir Sabir. However, Nirmal Purja confirmed in an interview that all the ropes have been left in place. Soon afterward, Mingma David shared two pictures from above Camp 4. One of them, below, shows Gelje Sherpa at the bottom of the Bottleneck, clipped to a yellow rope, which casts a shadow on the snow.

Gekje Sherpa approaches the Bottleneck on K2. Photo: Mingma David Sherpa

Mingma G also mentioned that particular picture in his talk with ExplorersWeb. “I was the last one rappeling down so I know all the ropes were left,” he explained. “That yellow rope in M. David’s picture is the first rope above Camp 4. [Ropes continued] from that point up to the summit.”

Mingma G also noted that beginning 250 to 300m above Camp 3, the Nepalis fixed rope all the way to Camp 4. “It took us more than eight hours to cover that distance while fixing on January 15 [after which they returned to Camp 3] Once fixed, on the following day [summit day] we needed only three hours.” They also placed ropes across the crevasse.

K2 World Cup

As for the secrecy in which the entire summit push was kept, Mingma previously explained that he and Nirmal Purja had agreed to join forces to summit on behalf of Nepal.

Mingma told ExplorersWeb, “When there is a football World Cup, do you ever want your country lose? No, never, you always want your country to get the trophy. And the team and the coach always keep the strategy secret to make those wishes possible. We were the same on K2 this time. We had our plan to become first but we never threatened to cut ropes. Once we are done with the summit, it doesn’t matter to us who climbs later.”

The controversy over the Nepali’s secret summit plans centres largely around how it affected John Snorri, Ali Sadpara, and Sajid Sadpara’s own planning. When the Nepalis prepared to move toward the summit on January 4, Snorri and the Sadparas were in Camp 2, planning to move to Camp 3 the following day.

Some have asked why Snorri’s team didn’t join the Nepalis. In previous interviews, Mingma G explained that Snorri’s decision to remain at C2 on January 15 was due to different forecasts: Snorri’s was wrong, the Nepalis’ was correct. It was also windier in Camp 2 where Snorri was than in Mingma G’s location at Camp 3. See a video of Mingma G’s Camp 3 here, in which their tents are not fluttering in the slightest.

Some sources have suggested that John Snorri and Ali were misled into thinking that the Nepali team was not going for the summit. But Mingma G denies having any role in the Snorri team’s decisions — or with their expedition at all.

Mingma G’s tent in Camp 3, shortly before the Nepali team launched their successful summit push. Frame from Mingma G’s video

“I didn’t exchange a single word with Snorri,” Mingma G said. “We never visited each other’s respective camps.”

Mingma G added: “They had two low-frequency radios, good for a construction site but not for the mountain. This is why Sajid had no contact with the summit team [on February 5]. He could contact Base Camp but not the climbers.”

“Regarding January 14 and 15, Snorri’s team’s weather report failed and they couldn’t reach Camp 3 on January 15…He also posted a video on January 15 from Camp 2, showing quite a strong wind — more than enough to make anyone quit in winter.”

By the time that the SST climbers and John Snorri’s team had launched their own summit push in early February, Mingma G had left Base Camp. However, as an accredited and highly experienced mountain guide, he had some insight to share: “Some of the climbers in the team were very experienced and they had over 120kph winds on January 23, so they should have checked everything before making the decision to launch a summit push [in early February],” he said. “These are the reasons I didn’t accept any commercial clients this time — because I saw [what happened] on K2 last winter.”

Last year, Mingma G launched a commercial expedition to winter K2 with Gao Li of China, Tomaz Rotar of Slovenia, and John Snorri of Iceland. The expedition was called off because of health issues affecting Mingma G and one of his climbing Sherpas. Gao Li had already left the expedition by this time.

Back home, John Snorri and Tomaz Rotar both posted highly critical comments about Mingma G’s expedition management and doubted that he ever intended to try to reach the summit. This year, John Snorri launched his own expedition and Tomaz Rotar joined the Seven Summit Treks group. As we know, Snorri went missing during his summit push. Rotar reached nearly 8,000m before turning around when he was unable to find a way around a huge crevasse.

The main voice still largely silent is Sajid Sadpara’s. Sajid is a quiet person who does not speak English fluently. However, ExplorersWeb has contacted his inner circle for further information about the events of February 5 and also how the decisions were made on January 15, when Snorri and Ali Sadpara remained in Camp 2, while Sajid himself carried loads to Camp 3, where he met Sergi Mingote and Juan Pablo Mohr.

+5

About the Author

Angela Benavides

Angela Benavides

Senior journalist, published author and communication consultant. Specialized on high-altitude mountaineering, with an interest for everything around the mountains: from economics to geopolitics. After five years exploring distant professional ranges, I returned to ExWeb BC in 2018. Feeling right at home since then!

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Paul
Paul
9 months ago

Good clarification!
For me the question about if all 10 summited because there is no group photo or video is a bit silly.
We could easily fine individual / in couples / smaller groups photos of each one from the group of 10, all photos are in the same light of sunset so it is obvious that all summited in the same time around 5pm.
For example, Alex Txikon, Simone Moro and Ali Sadpara summited Nanga Parbat in winter 2016, they never show group photo, did someone make any questions if they summited together?

+11
Farukh Ali
Farukh Ali
9 months ago
Reply to  Paul

They do have group photos together. In this picture Simone Moro and Ali Sadpara can be seen together. Alex Txikon is taking the picture.

+11
Screen Shot 2021-02-24 at 9.41.18 AM.png
Farukh Ali
Farukh Ali
9 months ago
Reply to  Paul

This one is of Ali Sadpara and Alex Txikon together. Simone Moro is taking the picture.

+9
Screen Shot 2021-02-24 at 9.40.36 AM.png
Paul
Paul
9 months ago
Reply to  Farukh Ali

So they do not have group photo. It is exactly same as the Nepalese on K2, all having individual photos or in smaller groups but not all together, Alex, Ali and Simone do not have photo all 3 together on one shot as some people expect from K2 team. Double standards??

+11
Manoj
Manoj
9 months ago
Reply to  Paul

Because they are not Nepalis.

+2
Boz Šahin
Boz Šahin
9 months ago
Reply to  Manoj

???

0
Don Paul
Don Paul
9 months ago

Mingma G. seems like a straight-up guy, and a responsible climbing guide. He’s not the first person to jump in front of the camera, or work the news media, and it’s about time his side of the story was told. I don’t think they did anything wrong, although this is not exactly a sporting event, since the stakes are life and death. I agree Angela about Sajid telling more about what happened, particularly how they crossed the crevasse. Snorri’s tracker seems to show him going far off route and returning then not moving for an hour at about where the… Read more »

Last edited 9 months ago by Don Paul
Manoj
Manoj
9 months ago
Reply to  Don Paul

Paul, you said it right. Thanks

+1
damiengildea
Editor
9 months ago

Thanks for pursuing this Angela. I hope MingmaG’s comments put the chatter to rest. It’s good to get different viewpoints on events such as this, but as in life, some views are better than others. Not all opinions are equal and sharing them as if they are creates a false equivalence that distorts the overall conversation and understanding of what happened, to nobody’s benefit. Hopefully readers and the climbing media can take some lessons from this seminal event when reporting on future ascents involving such a diverse range of participants. If only the climbing community, spectators and media had shown… Read more »

Alex
Alex
9 months ago
Reply to  damiengildea

Smh: “some views are better than others. Not all opinions are equal and sharing them as if they are creates a false equivalence that distorts the overall conversation and understanding of what happened, to nobody’s benefit. Hopefully readers and the climbing media can take some lessons from this seminal event when reporting on future ascents involving such a diverse range of participants.” Wow climb off your soapbox dude. So in other words only viewpoints you agree with should be shared?! That’s what I’m hearing as I read the comment above. I for one appreciate the authors willingness to question the… Read more »

damiengildea
Editor
9 months ago
Reply to  Alex

Nobody died under ‘strange circumstances’. In the history of K2 many climbers have fallen while descending tired, and often climbers have disappeared on the summit push, never to be seen again. This is pretty standard, unfortunately, as are issues with insufficient tents, oxygen malfunction, overambitious climbers and terrain changes. Turbocharging the drama on Instagram does not make an accident a crime. Cutting of ropes? Accusations based on speculation and ‘jokes’ are not ‘disturbing details’. Questions about the summit video/photos are just absurd, unrealistic and smack of sour grapes. Too stupid to warrant any more attention. It’s got nothing to do… Read more »

Don Paul
Don Paul
9 months ago
Reply to  Alex

This is ground zero for info about what happened. The best reporting, hands down. Otherwise, all these knowledgeable people would be commenting on some other website.

0
Max Madera
Max Madera
9 months ago
Reply to  damiengildea

I partially disagree. Quite a few people showed skepticism regarding Ueli’s summit in Annapurna that you need to refer to all the time (do you have more information about the matter?) while very few doubted that the Nepalese reached K2 (maybe Rotar, but it seemed out of frustration with the crevasse he couldn’t pass through. Clearly, there were previous issues going on between Mingma G. and Rotar, and Snorri). I don’t think any real climber took seriously the cutting of the ropes story. The complaints were more in line with the excessive competitiviness, with hidden strategies and so on. Of… Read more »

Max Madera
Max Madera
9 months ago
Reply to  Max Madera

When I say “people” I mean mountaineers. When news spread, which is common when people die in a mountain, especially in the countries of the deceased, then of course there are lots of comments from the internet as in any other topic. Conspiracy theories are then expected but I don’t believe that most people that have climbed high mountains would give them any credit. It is a part of the “denial” phase of the mourning.

0
Walter
Walter
9 months ago

The ropes were there but snow covered, an the most important is that there were not tent enough for all the climbers , no rest, no water , no place to cook, and finally tragedy

+5
Kate
Kate
9 months ago

Great interview. Interesting his comment about Nims departing the summit first and the rest following. He led the team off the summit and in my mind, kept his eye on the bigger success: getting down.

+7
damiengildea
Editor
9 months ago
Reply to  Kate

Nims was the only one climbing without bottled O2 so it was imperative for him to get down as fast as possible and not linger on the summit any longer than necessary, so I think it was more an act of self-preservation than leadership. MingmaG and his two teammates stayed on the summit after the others left and recorded more video.

+7
K2Killers2Justice
K2Killers2Justice
9 months ago

I’m sorry but looking at the pictures they look totally photo shopped / fake. They aren’t even good fakes from the looks of it. Not convinced at all. One picture I would really like to see is whether they did cut the ropes when they descended or otherwise sabotage them. Something is rotten in this whole story.

+5
Last edited 9 months ago by K2Killers2Justice
Paul
Paul
9 months ago

This photos with Sherpas names are frames from the movie so this is why they looks low quality, watch the movie and you will see all.

+5
Tenzin
Tenzin
9 months ago

Please stop this madness. People died. Some scarred forever. Please no more speculations. Give good closer to people who deserve a closer to move forward and who had enough of it.

+4
Last edited 9 months ago by Tenzin
Okkk
Okkk
9 months ago

It would have taken 1 minute to take a group pic. Honestly 10 ppl make a first ever K2 in winter historical summit and no one thinks to take a group shot.?!? It beggars belief. I don’t think we’ll ever know the real truth of the ropes and other rumours. PS Cutting a rope takes about 1 second. Not exactly hard work. They slice easily with the right implements so it’s not impossible. Given the amount of time it’s taken, a number of weeks , to even have a reply and provide proof of summit no wonder ppl are skeptics.… Read more »

Paul
Paul
9 months ago
Reply to  Okkk

Somehow Alex Txikon, Simone Moro and Ali Sadpara when climbed Nanga Parbat first time in winter didn’t take group photo and it was only 3 of them, have you some doubts if they climbed it? There is lots of photos that proof all of them on summit in same time.
Cut the rope is easy but how will you get down after? did you think about it? The fixed ropes mostly help with safe descent.
And Ali Sadpara home team already confirmed that Sajid said that there was fixed ropes in Bottleneck.

+6
Tenzin
Tenzin
9 months ago
Reply to  Paul

Paul, You nailed it. I don’t understand why some unnecessarily want to believe against the proof and common sense.

+3
MuddyBoots
MuddyBoots
9 months ago
Reply to  Paul

OKKK, can you “explain” how Sajid (and T. Rotar) would say that the ropes were in place and in good condition when the Nepali team allegedly cut them weeks earlier? Let’s see, will you now “explain” this by alleging that Sajid is part of your silly “conspiracy”? Or perhaps the Nepali team cut the lines…then they spontaneously regenerated and were back in place weeks later? PS Sajid’s report is available online, as interviewed by a climber who is bilingual, Samson Simon Sharaf, and there was a link to it here when you wrote your post. And proof of summit was… Read more »

Andrew
Andrew
9 months ago
Reply to  Okkk

They filmed a group video climbing the last stretch to the summit. Why on Earth does is matter that they didn’t take a photo as well? Y’all are just being petty and grasping for straws at this point…

+6
asho
asho
9 months ago
Reply to  Okkk

Pakistani are Cricket players not an elite climbers.

0
Boz Šahin
Boz Šahin
9 months ago
Reply to  asho

Ali Sadpara wasnt an elite climber?

0
Boz Šahin
Boz Šahin
9 months ago

“And the team and the coach always keep the strategy secret to make those wishes possible. We were the same on K2 this time. We had our plan to become first but we never threatened to cut ropes. Once we are done with the summit, it doesn’t matter to us who climbs later.” its naive to think that they would allow Ali (or someone else) to join them just because he is a HAP (like someone wrote before) and that they would have some kind of emphaty because of that, because Sherpas are also HAPs. They were selfish and wanted… Read more »

Tenzin
Tenzin
9 months ago
Reply to  Boz Šahin

Maybe no one else needed to be selfish… But nepali needed it for Nepal. How many sherpas died on mountains as guides. How many sherpas worked hard in extreme conditions for foreigners to achieve their goals. And what recognitions did sherpas get? Balti people will also have the same sense and emotions some day! This one last prestigious prize, Nepali wanted it for Nepal. What is wrong in this selfishness? It was not for an individual glory but for the country. The emotion is different from an individual selfish goal. It was for generations of sherpas who worked on mountains… Read more »

Boz Šahin
Boz Šahin
9 months ago
Reply to  Tenzin

Agree that many Sherpas worked hard in the past. Many of my favourite climbers are Sherpas. But mountaneering isnt some team sport where you only think about your country (we have national expeditions but we also have many international expeditions). Why i am saying this? Mountains are very dangerous and they are “selfish” also, and people should be supportive to each other because the mountain is a too strong oponent. Selfishness (in any form) has no place on the mountains because it can lead to bad (or tragic) situations. Mountanieers need to support each other and help each other if… Read more »

Don Paul
Don Paul
9 months ago
Reply to  Tenzin

This may be true, but K2 is in Pakistan, not Nepal. This was seen as a challenge by many Pakistanis to reconquer their own mountain. It is more like challenging someone to a duel, than to a normal sports competition. From what I saw in Karakoram Club and other groups, there was tremendous support but also tremendous pressure on the Sadpara/Snorri team to put Pakistan’s flag on it. I would like this more if planting flags on the summit wasn’t a part of it. That dates back to the times of the Durrand Line and the Raj, lol.

+2
Last edited 9 months ago by Don Paul
Tenzin
Tenzin
9 months ago
Reply to  Don Paul

What else to do Don Paul when all firsts in Nepali mountains are taken! Lol… Maybe i feel this way because i am nepali. Though i am not sherpa, i can still feel their emotion… may be not for you but for me personally planting flag, in our situation, means a lot.

+5
Last edited 9 months ago by Tenzin
Vanina
Vanina
9 months ago
Reply to  Tenzin

Could not agree more. I also think that the Nepali people deserved this. Besides, the HAP and sherpas are better climbers by default but sadly enough they have been invisible and unrecognized for years. They also proved that team work and spirits give better results and make the impossible possible.

+2
Samson Simon Sharaf
9 months ago

@Angela,
I have posted my detailed technical discussion on your previous article board with link of my blog. Do read it.

+1
F v
F v
9 months ago

CLEARING THE PLUME: K2 Winter: 2020-21 – INSIGHT AND FORESIGHT (wordpress.com) Well done Mr. Sharaf, thank you very much for this report. Ropes were perfect according to Saijd. In this article: UKC – An Oral History of the First Winter Ascent of K2 (ukclimbing.com) There’s a stunning picture of mingma g, the snow slope 200 meters below summit, above the serac. Well done by the 10 Nepalese! I think when they weren’t there, probably nobody reach summit of K2 this winter. Finding and fixing the route from C3 to C4 was an incredible task, caused by the crevasses, also mentioned… Read more »

Paul
Paul
9 months ago

Hi Samson, Nice writing but you made few mistakes: The most relevant: 1: Full Moon mentioned by Tomaz is actually a Last Quarter, on 4th Feb was exactly ‘half moon’ that rise at midnight and in snow environment it gives a lot of light so for sure he not mistaken it with a dawn before sunrise because it started only at 6am, that time Snorri crossed the crevasse and was on his way up. Tomaz said that he was back to C3 at dawn so he can’t be wrong about it. 2: There is lots if aberrations / errors readings… Read more »

Samson Simon Sharaf
9 months ago
Reply to  Paul

Thanks Paul. I always planned night movements according to moonlight available. On Night 4-5 Feb moon was in last quarter (49.5% Fading) which means it would be non luminous after 6 days. Moonrise over the western horizon would be past midnight and recede. False Dawn is ‘ a transient light which precedes the rising of the sun by about an hour, My point was that it was a fading moon in the beginning of Last Quarter. Recall, Tomaz mentions moonlight, “John and I were left alone, lost in an endless moment, staring across the crack at -55 degrees at full… Read more »

Boz Šahin
Boz Šahin
9 months ago

I will write it here @Tenzin Agree that many Sherpas worked hard in the past. Many of my favourite climbers are Sherpas. But mountaneering isnt some team sport where you only think about your country (we have national expeditions but we also have many international expeditions). Why i am saying this? Mountains are very dangerous and they are “selfish” also, and people should be supportive to each other because the mountain is a too strong oponent. Selfishness (in any form) has no place on the mountains because it can lead to bad (or tragic) situations. Mountanieers need to support each… Read more »

Tenzin
Tenzin
9 months ago
Reply to  Boz Šahin

Nepali team fixed the ropes from camp1 till the summit and left the ropes intact. Is that not helping? They informed shared about the danger of crevasse and routes they took to other climbers after summit. Is that not helping? Because of the weather Nepali team and foreign climbers couldnt meet at camp-3. Is that Nepali team’s fault? There are many things i want to say here but some involved are no more alive… so I dont want to talk about it.

+7
Giorgos
Giorgos
9 months ago
Reply to  Tenzin

Hi Tenzin! I followed that K2 Winder from the begining until now mostly from Explorersweb and also other sites and agree on what you say but i didn’t see anywhere this you say ”They informed shared about the danger of crevasse and routes they took to other climbers after summit”. Can you please give us the link about that.

0
Tenzin
Tenzin
9 months ago
Reply to  Giorgos

“According to Sajid, already a summiteer on K2 in 2019, the landscape ahead of camp 4 was completely different. There had been heavy snow and a big crevasse about 2.5 meters had opened up 50 M ahead of Camp 4 site and the Bottleneck. Sajid confirms that the Nepalese briefed them about this crevasse at the base camp but it had since widened.”

https://sharafs.wordpress.com/2021/02/23/clearing-the-plume-k2-winter-2020-21/amp/?__twitter_impression=true

+1
Yaromeer
9 months ago
Reply to  Boz Šahin

The approach from sherpa nation, towards rich ambitious mountainers coming from foreign countries, is evolving from originally shy and modest and open-hearted (as nepalis traditionally are) towards greedy and obviously nepalis treat the clients as source of money and disrespect them. BUT who is to be blamed for that shift of attitude? Guess what. If foreign people/mountainers have had treated nepalis (and in general all HAP in different countries) with respect they deserve (as their partner and guide) and also in basic humanly polite way, this situation could have been avoided. We the people are like that, no matter if… Read more »

Vanina
Vanina
9 months ago
Reply to  Yaromeer

Your comment is a spot on!I was horrified to read how the HAP Mehdi who assisted the first K2 summit push was treated. And he is not an exception.

https://www.bbc.com/news/magazine-28696985

+1
Last edited 9 months ago by Vanina
Boz Šahin
Boz Šahin
9 months ago
Reply to  Vanina

People on the mountain should be supportive to each other. As i said, selfishness in any form has no place on mountains.

+1
Taimur Khan
Taimur Khan
9 months ago

Who cares if they took a selfie together or not? Of course they didnt cut the ropes. Sajid would have mentioned it. In fact he would have been furious under the circumstances. By the way Sajid also said.his dad was in good shape during the final climb. He (Ali) had urged Sajid on at the bottleneck as well. He and the others also knew Sajod.would be waiting below, so if anything had happened to them and even one had survived they would have gone down for help. It seems the serac caved on them on the way down, or perhaps… Read more »

GM United Kingdom
GM United Kingdom
9 months ago

If the roles were reversed, and SST made the summit but the Nepali team perished.. would the same conspiracies be floating around? I don’t know the answer to this question, but it’s something worth thinking about.

+4
Tajunnisa
Tajunnisa
9 months ago

Nazir Saber is one of the experienced, competent and a supportive climbers of the world.He was expected to share his thoughts. So he just shared his personal experiences and his thoughts based on his experiences.
As we have lost Ali Sadpara unexpectedly so many of us posed questions for it.
Anyway good piece of writing, the shadow of picture with yellow rope shows a mid day picture, I think.

+1
Fahad
Fahad
9 months ago

It’s amazing to see how short the human memory is. Almost everyone here are cheering for Mingma G for his straight forward answers, but forget the in the past years he was heavily criticized, with supporting evidence, for multiple 8,000ers false summit claims, both in the Himalayas and Karakoram (if I’m not mistaken, the last controversy was on Broad Peak). I’m not joining the K2 conspiracy parade here, I think it was an amazing fit and it will definitely go down as an important milestone in mountaineering history – but please do not mistake charisma and integrity, especially from a… Read more »

Paul
Paul
9 months ago
Reply to  Fahad

Mingma G was on Broad Peak together with John Snorri and another 10 climbers, they summited in whiteout, the one that confirmed that it is summit was Pakistani climber Ali Raza, he was there just one week before as well. From all the group only Fredrik Sträng withdraw his claim that they summited, he is not sure if they did it:
https://www.facebook.com/fredrik.strang/posts/1646208438743322
So this case is not about Mingma G, it is about more climbers, including John Snorri and Ali Raza.

+2
Fahad
Fahad
9 months ago
Reply to  Paul

Well Paul, abviously it’s more complicated than just the one Facebook post you added here, and the discussion on that Broad Peak false summit claim was way larger than that, and with more participants, but in general, saying that only one to speak the truth is not enough to you, undermines the foundation of any Whistleblower ever to act, and historically speaking – it usually takes only one to do so. Add to that Nanga Parbat, Annapurna and the others, and you got yourself a completely different angle to everything.

0
Lenore Jones
Lenore Jones
9 months ago
Reply to  Fahad

I don’t consider an 8 meter lack of certainty in a blizzard to be a false claim. A mistaken claim, perhaps, or in this case more accurately an arguable claim. False claims would be people who stop well short of the top and falsify photos.

0
Fahad
Fahad
9 months ago
Reply to  Lenore Jones

Is “Jone Snori” really your name? Otherwise, considering the unfortunate and sad fate of the real person, with his real family and real friends – maybe it’s better to pay some respect to his memory, other than posting with his (misspelled) name.

About your comment, again, you fail by sticking to a single incident when actually there were a series of them, so what you “consider” or not (8 meters? blizzard? false summit claim can only be made by fake photos?), is merely a biased, uninformed, inaccurate opinion.

0
Lenore Jones
Lenore Jones
9 months ago
Reply to  Fahad

My name is Lenore Jones. Online I use my last name followed by a childhood nick. It never occurred to me until you pointed it out that it looks a lot like John Snorri’s name.

As to the rest, we disagree.

0
Don Paul
Don Paul
9 months ago
Reply to  Fahad

I liked Mingma G in this interview and found him very credible. I am not familiar with the scandals you mention and don’t follow this. I’m a rock climber and this is not my sport. But I can’t understand how he can say the entire route was fixed and he rappelled it, from anchor to anchor. A month later, there was no rope across the crevasse. I am trying to imagine how it could have been taken out in an avalanche or icefall, but can’t. If it was connected to anchors at both ends, there is no way it could… Read more »

Lenore Jones
Lenore Jones
9 months ago
Reply to  Don Paul

See the link above to the interview with Sajid. Three weeks of snow was plenty to hide all the fixed lines, and Sajid said that the crevasse, which they had been warned about, had widened in that time. You and many others are looking for someone to blame for these deaths, but deaths happen on these mountains without it being anyone’s fault. And that’s even more true in winter.

+1
Fahad
Fahad
9 months ago
Reply to  Don Paul

So let me get this straight Don, you authentically admit that you don’t know Mingma G personally, you don’t know his past and you consciously don’t follow it, mountaineering is not your sport and you don’t know a whole lot about it – but still, your first sentence in your comment is “I liked Mingma G in this interview and found him very credible”. After everything you just wrote, it’s kind of hard to see on which relevant tools are you basing your assumptions here. And again, I’m not talking about any of the conspiracy theories mentioned in other comments,… Read more »

delwyne trefz
delwyne trefz
9 months ago

Thanks Angela and Mingma G. If and when he is able it will be good to hear from Sajid any additional details he can provide of his Dad’s team’s summit push. Other than what Sajid and the other Nepalese summitters can add, I’ve very little interest in the opinions, suspicions or analysis of others.

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Lenore Jones
Lenore Jones
9 months ago
Reply to  delwyne trefz

See links in comments above to interview with Sajid.

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Mia
Mia
9 months ago

The question is would anyone has ever doubted if the first summiter had been a well-known white climber? These guys made history, the ‘impossible possible’ (Nims) – why don’t we celebrate them??? Just because they are Nepalese? O2 or no O2… Hehe, Nims made you silent, right? I’d recommend to the no O2 naysayers to climb in the same dresses and with the same tools than the first expeditions had. Hello world, wake up and share the happiness of this incredible Nepali team! Just consider – they were a team!!! Looks the strong individual-centered mindset of the western cultures doesn’t… Read more »

dgn
dgn
9 months ago

While this goes a long way to clear the air, I am amazed at the jingoism of comparing this to the World Cup, and viewing it as a race or a game of one team against another, keeping information secret, etc. When the risks are what they are in high altitude mountaineering, this makes absolutely no sense.

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Patrick Schofield
Patrick Schofield
9 months ago
Reply to  dgn

10 up 10 down safely in winter is a feat in itself.

+1
Lenore Jones
Lenore Jones
9 months ago
Reply to  dgn

They combined three teams to get there, so a lack of cooperation was not an issue.

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question everything
question everything
9 months ago

I wouldn’t have expected him to say any different
Unless someone reaches the great height of K2 in the near future we’ll never know what truth they’ll be able to surface… if any
RIP those who have lost their lives

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Last edited 9 months ago by question everything
Lenore Jones
Lenore Jones
9 months ago

I really don’t understand all these sour grapes. There has been plenty of evidence that they summited, and none that they did anything wrong. Give it up.

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question everything
question everything
9 months ago
Reply to  Lenore Jones

I was happy that Nims and Mingma’s teams summitted
but the sadness that I felt for John Snorri’s team is much greater
the fact that we may never know what happened is something that I’m having to accept

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Last edited 9 months ago by question everything
asho
asho
9 months ago

Pakistani Journalist are better commentor in the game of Cricket..Himayalism is for different breed.

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Boz Šahin
Boz Šahin
9 months ago
Reply to  asho

You obviously have hate for anyone who isnt Nepali. Go and lick your “mercenary heartthrob’s” rear.

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Last edited 9 months ago by Boz Šahin
Uttam
Uttam
9 months ago

Thus spake Mingma G, after coming down from the mountain. A Nietzschean ubermensch, with a brutal “will to power” for his dear dear dear country, and his dear dear dear community. Straight-shooting, level-headed, genuine, and humble to the nth degree. Respect!

+2
Last edited 9 months ago by Uttam
Fer
Fer
9 months ago

Yes

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Stephen Frank
Stephen Frank
9 months ago

I have no problem with them keeping their push a secret. They wanted to remind the world how they are far and away the best climbers. Reminds me of the USA ‘dream team’ olympic basketball the first year they competed.

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Dragon sherpa
Dragon sherpa
9 months ago

I am utterly thrilled seeing Sherpas making party on such a savage mountain in a group.Hold this beer, let me call Mingma G if they enjoyed it. They crushed it and congrats to all. Let’s not make a fuss about it sitting on warm sofa, we looser.♿️

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